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View Full Version : Removing a mapped network share in 'My Computer'



Norman
17-07-2005, 07:13 PM
Hi,

I just established a direct cable connection between a new XP and a dying
'98, to transfer files while I still can.

I followed all of the procedures, and seem to have stumbled on the very last
one. I called my host 98 PC 'Norman98', and apparantly got the syntax
incorrect when mapping it in the XP's 'My Computer'. It offered me local
drive 'Z', and I put:

//Norman98/c (apparently I should have put '//Norman98/share', but as a
first-timer this is still unclear to me). The host is set to share the whole
C: drive.

Anyway, I'm able to successfully connect but when I try to open the host
drive from XP's 'My Computer', I get:

'An error occured while reconnecting Z: to //Norman98/c'

and below that:

'Microsoft Windows Network: The local device name is already in use. This
connection has not been restored.' (The 'Detail' box in 'My Computer' shows
the proper size of my 98 hard drive -- total size and space used -- so it
'did' connect, I just can't open it to access files).

I've looked up solutions on the MS website, which told me to remove the
mapped drive, but not how to do so.

My two questions are:

1. How do I removed the mapped Z: drive
2. When I re-map the network drive, what is the proper syntax for the C:
drive on Norman98?

--
Regards,

Norman

David Candy
17-07-2005, 08:33 PM
1. On the tools menu. The entry underneath Map.

2. \\norman98\<whatever name you called the share>

3. Z sometimes has problems, try Y.



--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://webdiary.smh.com.au/archives/_comment/001075.html
=================================================
"Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:4030A262-915D-446A-A28B-9381FCAB7503@microsoft.com...
> Hi,
>
> I just established a direct cable connection between a new XP and a dying
> '98, to transfer files while I still can.
>
> I followed all of the procedures, and seem to have stumbled on the very last
> one. I called my host 98 PC 'Norman98', and apparantly got the syntax
> incorrect when mapping it in the XP's 'My Computer'. It offered me local
> drive 'Z', and I put:
>
> //Norman98/c (apparently I should have put '//Norman98/share', but as a
> first-timer this is still unclear to me). The host is set to share the whole
> C: drive.
>
> Anyway, I'm able to successfully connect but when I try to open the host
> drive from XP's 'My Computer', I get:
>
> 'An error occured while reconnecting Z: to //Norman98/c'
>
> and below that:
>
> 'Microsoft Windows Network: The local device name is already in use. This
> connection has not been restored.' (The 'Detail' box in 'My Computer' shows
> the proper size of my 98 hard drive -- total size and space used -- so it
> 'did' connect, I just can't open it to access files).
>
> I've looked up solutions on the MS website, which told me to remove the
> mapped drive, but not how to do so.
>
> My two questions are:
>
> 1. How do I removed the mapped Z: drive
> 2. When I re-map the network drive, what is the proper syntax for the C:
> drive on Norman98?
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Norman

Norman
17-07-2005, 08:54 PM
Thank you David. I found the method to delete the share a bit ago. I tried Y
as you suggested, but am getting the same error message, i.e. that the local
device name is still in use.

Can one share an entire drive, such as the C drive?

--
Regards,

Norman


"David Candy" wrote:

> 1. On the tools menu. The entry underneath Map.
>
> 2. \\norman98\<whatever name you called the share>
>
> 3. Z sometimes has problems, try Y.

Kerry Brown
18-07-2005, 02:43 AM
"Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:4030A262-915D-446A-A28B-9381FCAB7503@microsoft.com...
> Hi,
>
> I just established a direct cable connection between a new XP and a dying
> '98, to transfer files while I still can.
>
> I followed all of the procedures, and seem to have stumbled on the very
> last
> one. I called my host 98 PC 'Norman98', and apparantly got the syntax
> incorrect when mapping it in the XP's 'My Computer'. It offered me local
> drive 'Z', and I put:
>
> //Norman98/c (apparently I should have put '//Norman98/share', but as a
> first-timer this is still unclear to me). The host is set to share the
> whole
> C: drive.
>
> Anyway, I'm able to successfully connect but when I try to open the host
> drive from XP's 'My Computer', I get:
>
> 'An error occured while reconnecting Z: to //Norman98/c'
>
> and below that:
>
> 'Microsoft Windows Network: The local device name is already in use. This
> connection has not been restored.' (The 'Detail' box in 'My Computer'
> shows
> the proper size of my 98 hard drive -- total size and space used -- so it
> 'did' connect, I just can't open it to access files).
>
> I've looked up solutions on the MS website, which told me to remove the
> mapped drive, but not how to do so.
>
> My two questions are:
>
> 1. How do I removed the mapped Z: drive
> 2. When I re-map the network drive, what is the proper syntax for the C:
> drive on Norman98?
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Norman

I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new computer
to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a cable.
Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the one from
the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old Computer" and
copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need. Make sure
you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are being
copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in the old
computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the files you
need the folder can be safely deleted.

Kerry

Norman
18-07-2005, 08:13 AM
Thanks for your reply Kerry. It's a good suggestion -- and one I may follow
in the future -- but right now I need to get some critical files out of this
dying drive, pronto! <G>

--
Regards,

Norman

> > Norman
>
> I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new computer
> to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a cable.
> Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the one from
> the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old Computer" and
> copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need. Make sure
> you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are being
> copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in the old
> computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the files you
> need the folder can be safely deleted.
>
> Kerry
>
>
>

Kerry Brown
18-07-2005, 09:03 AM
"Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:43C68BF5-3FBC-4969-AA88-C33E7A6BFA7A@microsoft.com...
> Thanks for your reply Kerry. It's a good suggestion -- and one I may
> follow
> in the future -- but right now I need to get some critical files out of
> this
> dying drive, pronto! <G>
>

Temporarily installing the drive in the new computer is probably the
quickest and easiest way. You can use xcopy with the /c switch to ignore
errors. This will copy whatever Windows can read. Also it is less stress on
a dying drive as you just need to do one copy operation rather than booting
to Windows, configuring networking, possibly rebooting etc.

In answer to your original question, yes, you can share the c drive. First
right click on My Computer in XP. Pick Disconnect network drive and pick Z.
Then double click on My Computer in 98. Right click on drive c: and make
sure it is shared. Reboot both computers. Right click on My Computer in XP
and pick Map network drive. Pick a letter other than Z. If this doesn't work
something is wrong with the 98 installation or with the network setup on one
or both of the computers. Thus my suggestion of installing the drive in the
XP computer.

Kerry

> --
> Regards,
>
> Norman
>
>> > Norman
>>
>> I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new
>> computer
>> to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a cable.
>> Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the one
>> from
>> the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old Computer" and
>> copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need. Make
>> sure
>> you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are being
>> copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in the old
>> computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the files
>> you
>> need the folder can be safely deleted.
>>
>> Kerry
>>
>>
>>

Norman
18-07-2005, 09:53 AM
Hi Kerry,

Thanks again for your suggestions. Perhaps I have to more seriously consider
your suggestion (something new to learn <G>), as I'm not making any progress
with being able to go that final step with sharing the drive.

As a point of interest...the reason I have a dying hard drive is that I
tried to 'upgrad' to Norton Internet Security '05 about a week ago. It didn't
install properly, didn't uninstall properly, and basically 'ate' my drive
<G>. The only positive is that I learned to identify 7 or 8 provincial Indian
accents, as I spent the week with various tech support lines!

--
Regards,

Norman


"Kerry Brown" wrote:

>
> Temporarily installing the drive in the new computer is probably the
> quickest and easiest way. You can use xcopy with the /c switch to ignore
> errors. This will copy whatever Windows can read. Also it is less stress on
> a dying drive as you just need to do one copy operation rather than booting
> to Windows, configuring networking, possibly rebooting etc.
>
> In answer to your original question, yes, you can share the c drive. First
> right click on My Computer in XP. Pick Disconnect network drive and pick Z.
> Then double click on My Computer in 98. Right click on drive c: and make
> sure it is shared. Reboot both computers. Right click on My Computer in XP
> and pick Map network drive. Pick a letter other than Z. If this doesn't work
> something is wrong with the 98 installation or with the network setup on one
> or both of the computers. Thus my suggestion of installing the drive in the
> XP computer.
>
> Kerry
>
> > --
> > Regards,
> >
> > Norman
> >
> >> > Norman
> >>
> >> I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new
> >> computer
> >> to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a cable.
> >> Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the one
> >> from
> >> the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old Computer" and
> >> copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need. Make
> >> sure
> >> you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are being
> >> copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in the old
> >> computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the files
> >> you
> >> need the folder can be safely deleted.
> >>
> >> Kerry
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>
>

Norman
18-07-2005, 10:03 AM
Kerry,

Another question please. I know that my XP manual details installing a
second hard drive, so I should be able to find the necessary information
there. However, as the problem with the 98 drive is largely a Windows one
(there's difficulty booting into Windows, and after about 15 minutes the
screen goes black and I'm forced to warm boot), will installing it into my XP
allow me to access the data on the drive without worrying about its Windows
problems?

In other words, as the XP machine will be the Windows drive, will I be able
to just treat the files on the 98 drive as a medium where data is stored, and
therefore easily copy it over to my XP drive? A basic question no doubt, but
that's where I am <G>.

Thanks again.

--
Regards,

Norman


"Kerry Brown" wrote:

> "Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:43C68BF5-3FBC-4969-AA88-C33E7A6BFA7A@microsoft.com...
> > Thanks for your reply Kerry. It's a good suggestion -- and one I may
> > follow
> > in the future -- but right now I need to get some critical files out of
> > this
> > dying drive, pronto! <G>
> >
>
> Temporarily installing the drive in the new computer is probably the
> quickest and easiest way. You can use xcopy with the /c switch to ignore
> errors. This will copy whatever Windows can read. Also it is less stress on
> a dying drive as you just need to do one copy operation rather than booting
> to Windows, configuring networking, possibly rebooting etc.
>
> In answer to your original question, yes, you can share the c drive. First
> right click on My Computer in XP. Pick Disconnect network drive and pick Z.
> Then double click on My Computer in 98. Right click on drive c: and make
> sure it is shared. Reboot both computers. Right click on My Computer in XP
> and pick Map network drive. Pick a letter other than Z. If this doesn't work
> something is wrong with the 98 installation or with the network setup on one
> or both of the computers. Thus my suggestion of installing the drive in the
> XP computer.
>
> Kerry
>
> > --
> > Regards,
> >
> > Norman
> >
> >> > Norman
> >>
> >> I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new
> >> computer
> >> to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a cable.
> >> Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the one
> >> from
> >> the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old Computer" and
> >> copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need. Make
> >> sure
> >> you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are being
> >> copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in the old
> >> computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the files
> >> you
> >> need the folder can be safely deleted.
> >>
> >> Kerry
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>
>

Kerry Brown
18-07-2005, 10:43 AM
"Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:9474E665-EA63-47BA-8AB7-51D6FACA520F@microsoft.com...
> Kerry,
>
> Another question please. I know that my XP manual details installing a
> second hard drive, so I should be able to find the necessary information
> there. However, as the problem with the 98 drive is largely a Windows one
> (there's difficulty booting into Windows, and after about 15 minutes the
> screen goes black and I'm forced to warm boot), will installing it into my
> XP
> allow me to access the data on the drive without worrying about its
> Windows
> problems?
>
> In other words, as the XP machine will be the Windows drive, will I be
> able
> to just treat the files on the 98 drive as a medium where data is stored,
> and
> therefore easily copy it over to my XP drive? A basic question no doubt,
> but
> that's where I am <G>.
>

I am assuming both drives are PATA drives, IDE drives using a 40 pin, 80
wire cable. If the new computer has a SATA drive then the process is
different. First make sure both computers are unplugged from the AC power.
Next make sure the jumpers for the drive in the XP computer are set for
Master operation. Next make sure the jumpers for the drive from the 98
computer are set for Slave operation. Most drives have a diagram on the
drive explaining how to set the jumpers. Hook up both drives on the same
cable in the XP computer. Depending on how the BIOS in the new computer
works the 98 drive may or may not be automatically recognized. Most new
computers are set to automatically find any connected drives. When you boot
up the new computer with both drives installed the XP drive should be c: and
the 98 drive should be d:. You can copy files at will. Windows 98 drives are
formatted with the FAT32 file system so there are no issues with file
ownership or permissions. If the 98 drive doesn't show up in Windows XP you
may have to go into the BIOS before Windows boots up and tell the BIOS to
find the drive. Every manufacturer seems to have a different way to do this.
You will have to look in the computer or motherboard manual for how to do it
for your system. If you are hesitant then ask a friend who knows something
about computers or take both computers to a shop and ask then to transfer
the files. It is possible to cause a computer to not boot by making the
wrong changes in the BIOS. It is also possible to cause permanent damage by
hooking things up wrong. This is unlikely but it is possible.

Kerry


> Thanks again.
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Norman
>
>
> "Kerry Brown" wrote:
>
>> "Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:43C68BF5-3FBC-4969-AA88-C33E7A6BFA7A@microsoft.com...
>> > Thanks for your reply Kerry. It's a good suggestion -- and one I may
>> > follow
>> > in the future -- but right now I need to get some critical files out of
>> > this
>> > dying drive, pronto! <G>
>> >
>>
>> Temporarily installing the drive in the new computer is probably the
>> quickest and easiest way. You can use xcopy with the /c switch to ignore
>> errors. This will copy whatever Windows can read. Also it is less stress
>> on
>> a dying drive as you just need to do one copy operation rather than
>> booting
>> to Windows, configuring networking, possibly rebooting etc.
>>
>> In answer to your original question, yes, you can share the c drive.
>> First
>> right click on My Computer in XP. Pick Disconnect network drive and pick
>> Z.
>> Then double click on My Computer in 98. Right click on drive c: and make
>> sure it is shared. Reboot both computers. Right click on My Computer in
>> XP
>> and pick Map network drive. Pick a letter other than Z. If this doesn't
>> work
>> something is wrong with the 98 installation or with the network setup on
>> one
>> or both of the computers. Thus my suggestion of installing the drive in
>> the
>> XP computer.
>>
>> Kerry
>>
>> > --
>> > Regards,
>> >
>> > Norman
>> >
>> >> > Norman
>> >>
>> >> I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new
>> >> computer
>> >> to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a cable.
>> >> Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the one
>> >> from
>> >> the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old Computer"
>> >> and
>> >> copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need. Make
>> >> sure
>> >> you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are
>> >> being
>> >> copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in the
>> >> old
>> >> computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the files
>> >> you
>> >> need the folder can be safely deleted.
>> >>
>> >> Kerry
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>>
>>
>>

Norman
18-07-2005, 11:23 AM
Kerry,

Many, many thanks for taking the time to detail the process. I appreciate it.
--
Regards,

Norman


>
> I am assuming both drives are PATA drives, IDE drives using a 40 pin, 80
> wire cable. If the new computer has a SATA drive then the process is
> different. First make sure both computers are unplugged from the AC power.
> Next make sure the jumpers for the drive in the XP computer are set for
> Master operation. Next make sure the jumpers for the drive from the 98
> computer are set for Slave operation. Most drives have a diagram on the
> drive explaining how to set the jumpers. Hook up both drives on the same
> cable in the XP computer. Depending on how the BIOS in the new computer
> works the 98 drive may or may not be automatically recognized. Most new
> computers are set to automatically find any connected drives. When you boot
> up the new computer with both drives installed the XP drive should be c: and
> the 98 drive should be d:. You can copy files at will. Windows 98 drives are
> formatted with the FAT32 file system so there are no issues with file
> ownership or permissions. If the 98 drive doesn't show up in Windows XP you
> may have to go into the BIOS before Windows boots up and tell the BIOS to
> find the drive. Every manufacturer seems to have a different way to do this.
> You will have to look in the computer or motherboard manual for how to do it
> for your system. If you are hesitant then ask a friend who knows something
> about computers or take both computers to a shop and ask then to transfer
> the files. It is possible to cause a computer to not boot by making the
> wrong changes in the BIOS. It is also possible to cause permanent damage by
> hooking things up wrong. This is unlikely but it is possible.
>
> Kerry
>
>
> > Thanks again.
> >
> > --
> > Regards,
> >
> > Norman
> >
> >
> > "Kerry Brown" wrote:
> >
> >> "Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> >> news:43C68BF5-3FBC-4969-AA88-C33E7A6BFA7A@microsoft.com...
> >> > Thanks for your reply Kerry. It's a good suggestion -- and one I may
> >> > follow
> >> > in the future -- but right now I need to get some critical files out of
> >> > this
> >> > dying drive, pronto! <G>
> >> >
> >>
> >> Temporarily installing the drive in the new computer is probably the
> >> quickest and easiest way. You can use xcopy with the /c switch to ignore
> >> errors. This will copy whatever Windows can read. Also it is less stress
> >> on
> >> a dying drive as you just need to do one copy operation rather than
> >> booting
> >> to Windows, configuring networking, possibly rebooting etc.
> >>
> >> In answer to your original question, yes, you can share the c drive.
> >> First
> >> right click on My Computer in XP. Pick Disconnect network drive and pick
> >> Z.
> >> Then double click on My Computer in 98. Right click on drive c: and make
> >> sure it is shared. Reboot both computers. Right click on My Computer in
> >> XP
> >> and pick Map network drive. Pick a letter other than Z. If this doesn't
> >> work
> >> something is wrong with the 98 installation or with the network setup on
> >> one
> >> or both of the computers. Thus my suggestion of installing the drive in
> >> the
> >> XP computer.
> >>
> >> Kerry
> >>
> >> > --
> >> > Regards,
> >> >
> >> > Norman
> >> >
> >> >> > Norman
> >> >>
> >> >> I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new
> >> >> computer
> >> >> to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a cable.
> >> >> Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the one
> >> >> from
> >> >> the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old Computer"
> >> >> and
> >> >> copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need. Make
> >> >> sure
> >> >> you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are
> >> >> being
> >> >> copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in the
> >> >> old
> >> >> computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the files
> >> >> you
> >> >> need the folder can be safely deleted.
> >> >>
> >> >> Kerry
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
>
>
>

Kerry Brown
18-07-2005, 12:13 PM
"Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:8F35C8DB-1F8D-410A-9412-771169C08E78@microsoft.com...
> Kerry,
>
> Many, many thanks for taking the time to detail the process. I appreciate
> it.
> --
> Regards,
>
> Norman
>
>

Your welcome. Good luck getting the files transfered.

Kerry

>>
>> I am assuming both drives are PATA drives, IDE drives using a 40 pin, 80
>> wire cable. If the new computer has a SATA drive then the process is
>> different. First make sure both computers are unplugged from the AC
>> power.
>> Next make sure the jumpers for the drive in the XP computer are set for
>> Master operation. Next make sure the jumpers for the drive from the 98
>> computer are set for Slave operation. Most drives have a diagram on the
>> drive explaining how to set the jumpers. Hook up both drives on the same
>> cable in the XP computer. Depending on how the BIOS in the new computer
>> works the 98 drive may or may not be automatically recognized. Most new
>> computers are set to automatically find any connected drives. When you
>> boot
>> up the new computer with both drives installed the XP drive should be c:
>> and
>> the 98 drive should be d:. You can copy files at will. Windows 98 drives
>> are
>> formatted with the FAT32 file system so there are no issues with file
>> ownership or permissions. If the 98 drive doesn't show up in Windows XP
>> you
>> may have to go into the BIOS before Windows boots up and tell the BIOS to
>> find the drive. Every manufacturer seems to have a different way to do
>> this.
>> You will have to look in the computer or motherboard manual for how to do
>> it
>> for your system. If you are hesitant then ask a friend who knows
>> something
>> about computers or take both computers to a shop and ask then to transfer
>> the files. It is possible to cause a computer to not boot by making the
>> wrong changes in the BIOS. It is also possible to cause permanent damage
>> by
>> hooking things up wrong. This is unlikely but it is possible.
>>
>> Kerry
>>
>>
>> > Thanks again.
>> >
>> > --
>> > Regards,
>> >
>> > Norman
>> >
>> >
>> > "Kerry Brown" wrote:
>> >
>> >> "Norman" <Norman@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:43C68BF5-3FBC-4969-AA88-C33E7A6BFA7A@microsoft.com...
>> >> > Thanks for your reply Kerry. It's a good suggestion -- and one I may
>> >> > follow
>> >> > in the future -- but right now I need to get some critical files out
>> >> > of
>> >> > this
>> >> > dying drive, pronto! <G>
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> Temporarily installing the drive in the new computer is probably the
>> >> quickest and easiest way. You can use xcopy with the /c switch to
>> >> ignore
>> >> errors. This will copy whatever Windows can read. Also it is less
>> >> stress
>> >> on
>> >> a dying drive as you just need to do one copy operation rather than
>> >> booting
>> >> to Windows, configuring networking, possibly rebooting etc.
>> >>
>> >> In answer to your original question, yes, you can share the c drive.
>> >> First
>> >> right click on My Computer in XP. Pick Disconnect network drive and
>> >> pick
>> >> Z.
>> >> Then double click on My Computer in 98. Right click on drive c: and
>> >> make
>> >> sure it is shared. Reboot both computers. Right click on My Computer
>> >> in
>> >> XP
>> >> and pick Map network drive. Pick a letter other than Z. If this
>> >> doesn't
>> >> work
>> >> something is wrong with the 98 installation or with the network setup
>> >> on
>> >> one
>> >> or both of the computers. Thus my suggestion of installing the drive
>> >> in
>> >> the
>> >> XP computer.
>> >>
>> >> Kerry
>> >>
>> >> > --
>> >> > Regards,
>> >> >
>> >> > Norman
>> >> >
>> >> >> > Norman
>> >> >>
>> >> >> I usually install the hard drive from the old computer in the new
>> >> >> computer
>> >> >> to copy the files over. The copying is much quicker than over a
>> >> >> cable.
>> >> >> Usually the hard drive in the new computer is much larger than the
>> >> >> one
>> >> >> from
>> >> >> the old computer. Make a folder called something like "Old
>> >> >> Computer"
>> >> >> and
>> >> >> copy the entire contents. You never know what files you may need.
>> >> >> Make
>> >> >> sure
>> >> >> you have an antivirus program set to autoscan the files as they are
>> >> >> being
>> >> >> copied. Once the files are copied you can reinstall the drive in
>> >> >> the
>> >> >> old
>> >> >> computer. After a month or so when you are sure you have all the
>> >> >> files
>> >> >> you
>> >> >> need the folder can be safely deleted.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Kerry
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>> >>
>>
>>
>>

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