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Sean McBrien
20-07-2005, 12:10 AM
Hi does anyone know any 16 bit dos programs that can read and copy from NTFS
to fat32 drives. (any other than ntfsdos.exe and active dos(readntfs.exe))
be very grateful!

Thanks
--
Sean McBrien

BC
20-07-2005, 01:03 AM
You can also do it via a Linux boot disk --
take a look at this: http://trinityhome.org/trk

-BC

Ron Martell
20-07-2005, 06:53 AM
Sean McBrien <SeanMcBrien@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>Hi does anyone know any 16 bit dos programs that can read and copy from NTFS
>to fat32 drives. (any other than ntfsdos.exe and active dos(readntfs.exe))
>be very grateful!
>
>Thanks

Why? Is there some shortcoming or other problem with the ones you have
listed? If so then others might benefit from knowing this.


Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
http://aumha.org/alex.htm

Sean McBrien
20-07-2005, 07:00 AM
yeah, well the business i work for sometimes has problems with hard drives
failing but its not predictable if the computer will be fat32 or ntfs. the
ones i listed have problems with using too much cache memory and not being
able to run a few batch files i have created.


--
Sean McBrien


"Ron Martell" wrote:

> Sean McBrien <SeanMcBrien@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
>
> >Hi does anyone know any 16 bit dos programs that can read and copy from NTFS
> >to fat32 drives. (any other than ntfsdos.exe and active dos(readntfs.exe))
> >be very grateful!
> >
> >Thanks
>
> Why? Is there some shortcoming or other problem with the ones you have
> listed? If so then others might benefit from knowing this.
>
>
> Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
> --
> Microsoft MVP
> On-Line Help Computer Service
> http://onlinehelp.bc.ca
>
> In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
> http://aumha.org/alex.htm
>

BC
20-07-2005, 07:40 AM
Besides that Linux thing, you can also try creating
a BartPE CD: http://www.nu2.nu/pebuilder

In either case, you create a bootable CD that will
give you both access to NTFS and FAT32 partitions,
as well letting you copy files off the troubled
drive in question over the network.

When replacing the drive, use FAT32 -- the security
benefits of NTFS are marginal and are greatly
outweighed by the much greater hassle of trouble-
shooting serious Windows problems and recovering
data from failing disks. While NTFS is suppose to
be better than FAT32 in protecting the integrity of
data, in real life situations where the hard drive
is being to fail, Windows 2K/XP will just blue
screen you and you need to get the data off as
quickly as possible.

-BC

Sean McBrien
20-07-2005, 09:13 AM
I tried with BartPE but found that it hangs, i guess the reason for this is
the fact is that when its trying to intialise the hard drive, it cant and
therefore stops to work. unless you know another reason why it wouldnt work.
Your suggestions are good though, keep them coming if you have any more. :-)

--
Sean McBrien


"BC" wrote:

> Besides that Linux thing, you can also try creating
> a BartPE CD: http://www.nu2.nu/pebuilder
>
> In either case, you create a bootable CD that will
> give you both access to NTFS and FAT32 partitions,
> as well letting you copy files off the troubled
> drive in question over the network.
>
> When replacing the drive, use FAT32 -- the security
> benefits of NTFS are marginal and are greatly
> outweighed by the much greater hassle of trouble-
> shooting serious Windows problems and recovering
> data from failing disks. While NTFS is suppose to
> be better than FAT32 in protecting the integrity of
> data, in real life situations where the hard drive
> is being to fail, Windows 2K/XP will just blue
> screen you and you need to get the data off as
> quickly as possible.
>
> -BC
>
>

BC
20-07-2005, 11:21 AM
In that case, I would try that Linux solution.
That's good info to know about that BartPE CD
limitation -- I'll try to verify it. My poor
old collection of once invaluable network boot
floppy disks are almost obsolete now.

I recently had helped a friend with a 5-month
old notebook with a failing drive. It was an
ultralightweight model with no floppy, no PS/2
ports, and with a harddrive you couldn't remove
without voiding the warranty. What a colossal
pain that was. I was able to chill it down in the
fridge enough to have it work in Safe Mode w/
Network for a few minutes at a time before the
drive would start to click and flake out again.
And the last time I chilled it, the touchpad
flaked out and I had no USB mice handy, grrr....

That did give me time to get off his key files,
but he wasn't so lucky on his 900Mb Outlook.pst
file -- I ALMOST got all of it off before the
drive went out for good. But it got clipped
slightly and the Inbox Repair Tool did a sloppy
recovery -- no emails more recent than 2 months
old and most of his contacts gone. But he still
had the DVD with a better Outlook.pst file I
recovered for him - about 5 months prior earlier.
People don't realize how vulnerable those often
gigantic, monolithic pst files are.

He had a 1 Gb USB Flash key, but that wasn't big
enough for him to back up everything so I told him
he's going to have to get a USB hard drive for a
more complete backup, and one with some decent
software.

I'm also thinking of trying to create a portable
or transportable PXE server to use as a recovery
tool for the newer PC's, but PXE and its software
looks pretty half-ass and time consuming to get
running. And since a Linux boot appears to be the
most useful for recovery, I'm not sure it would
gain me much over a boot CD.

We'll see.

Things should be a bit easier by now....

-BC

Sean McBrien
20-07-2005, 09:30 PM
Yeah that linux disc works. Great job, just another little thing which i know
isnt to do with windows but i was wondering if you know how to create a share
in linux so that i can transfer the files over the network to another pc
rather than using loads of cd's. Tried looking at smb.conf in the samba
folder but really not much of an idea to where to start?

lol maybe you should have tried a beer fridge, put a nice chilled beer
beside the laptop and it might have relaxed. solved the problem no end.

Thanks alot of your help!!
--
Sean McBrien


"BC" wrote:

> In that case, I would try that Linux solution.
> That's good info to know about that BartPE CD
> limitation -- I'll try to verify it. My poor
> old collection of once invaluable network boot
> floppy disks are almost obsolete now.
>
> I recently had helped a friend with a 5-month
> old notebook with a failing drive. It was an
> ultralightweight model with no floppy, no PS/2
> ports, and with a harddrive you couldn't remove
> without voiding the warranty. What a colossal
> pain that was. I was able to chill it down in the
> fridge enough to have it work in Safe Mode w/
> Network for a few minutes at a time before the
> drive would start to click and flake out again.
> And the last time I chilled it, the touchpad
> flaked out and I had no USB mice handy, grrr....
>
> That did give me time to get off his key files,
> but he wasn't so lucky on his 900Mb Outlook.pst
> file -- I ALMOST got all of it off before the
> drive went out for good. But it got clipped
> slightly and the Inbox Repair Tool did a sloppy
> recovery -- no emails more recent than 2 months
> old and most of his contacts gone. But he still
> had the DVD with a better Outlook.pst file I
> recovered for him - about 5 months prior earlier.
> People don't realize how vulnerable those often
> gigantic, monolithic pst files are.
>
> He had a 1 Gb USB Flash key, but that wasn't big
> enough for him to back up everything so I told him
> he's going to have to get a USB hard drive for a
> more complete backup, and one with some decent
> software.
>
> I'm also thinking of trying to create a portable
> or transportable PXE server to use as a recovery
> tool for the newer PC's, but PXE and its software
> looks pretty half-ass and time consuming to get
> running. And since a Linux boot appears to be the
> most useful for recovery, I'm not sure it would
> gain me much over a boot CD.
>
> We'll see.
>
> Things should be a bit easier by now....
>
> -BC
>
>

BC
20-07-2005, 11:20 PM
You should be able to attach to a Windows
share instead and copy off:
http://trinityhome.org/trk/usage.shtml#faq010

Chilling the hard drive is a very old trick. All
the prior times, though, I was able to remove
the drive, but chilling the entire PC worked
somewhat, if not quite so conveniently. I should
mention that when I took the notebook out of
the fridge I also kept it on an ice pack while I
worked on it to keep it as chilled down as
long as possible.

Thinking about this is making me thirsty for
some stange reason....

-BC

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