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luther
08-09-2005, 09:41 PM
Hi all,

Thought I'd ask if anyone knows where I can get a light prism from? You know, one of those triangular/pyramid shaped things where you shine a white light through, and it refracts all the colours like a rainbow. I have tried various seraches, and cannot seem to narrow down a place that will sell them! I would have thought they'd be easy...

Note I would like to find a place East of Melbourne!

Cheers
luther

Las
08-09-2005, 09:45 PM
im not sure but any place that sells scientific cool stuff should have it..

maybe National Geographic might sell them.

:) good luck.

harvs
08-09-2005, 09:51 PM
Any weirdo hippie store with lots of candles, karma and astrology literature... you know, those places that usually smell like weed incense. They always have gems and crystal trinkets. The shops on Brunswick Street are a safe bet. :p

jokiin
08-09-2005, 09:53 PM
I don't know my way around Melbourne so I'm not sure how close this is to you http://www.camartech.com.au/eqs/shop.php3?aisle=sciencem-p

cam art/craft and technology
197 Blackburn Road
Mount Waverley
VIC Australia 3149

Tel: Australia 03 9802 4200

www.camartech.com.au

luther
08-09-2005, 10:06 PM
Thanks all for the quick responses. Just checked Australian Geographic (I was also searching under 'National Geographic' with no luck!) and looks like they have a Science Kit with a prism in it. The whole kit is $60, but hopefully they sell prisms separately. I will call tomorrow.

I will also try the cam art place in Mt Waverley (is only about 15 minutes from where I'll be on Saturday anyway). I e-mailed them asking if I can buy direct, and if they are open this weekend! I will have to try and call them tomorrow too.

Thanks again, but I seemed to struggle with my google searches in actually locating a product for sale. All I could find was the science esperiments to do, which I already know! :cool:

jokiin
08-09-2005, 10:15 PM
If they turn out too dear you could try this place in the US http://www.indigo.com/science-supplies/gph-science-supply/glass-prism.html they seem quite cheap, postage for a small item is generally pretty cheap too, can take a while though.

luther
08-09-2005, 10:20 PM
If they turn out too dear you could try this place in the US http://www.indigo.com/science-supplies/gph-science-supply/glass-prism.html they seem quite cheap, postage for a small item is generally pretty cheap too, can take a while though.
Thanks - can they deliver by Monday??? :dD

I would love to have one for Monday. I am teaching a Grade 2 class, and they are doing 'light'. Just thought it would be cool to give them a few demos. I have a laser light I can use to show them that light reflects off water, etc. I want to do a colour wheel, and thought showing them the white light into colours first would help explain why the colours blended then turn white!

Frogface
08-09-2005, 11:48 PM
Such dedication, you sound like a fun teacher to have :)

If you're really desperate, go ask the local high school. I borrowed heaps from my school for a science experiment earlier this year.

siliegrrl
09-09-2005, 09:21 AM
Scienceworks usually have this sort of stuff in their gift shop and are open on the weekends. The other option is to ask the physics department at a local school or uni :)

custos
09-09-2005, 09:36 AM
Off topic a bit, but regarding teaching kids about light... Many years ago a had a light "windmill" consisting of black "wind vane" balanced on a needle point, totally enclosed in a glass bulb. When you shone light on it the vane spun around -- thus demonstrating the dual wave/particle properties of light. :cool:

princessnay
09-09-2005, 11:57 AM
i dont know about melbourne but wild has them atm! i saw one last night! and possibly places like things could too! Hope that helps!

luther
09-09-2005, 04:30 PM
I rang the cam art place in Mt Waverley, and can go there b/w 10 and 2 tomorrow! Thanks for all the responses.

As for teaching them, I am also using a laser light, and you spray water into the beam so it shows up - a bit like those electronic beams in movies like Entrapment and Mission : Impossible. They'll have a ball!

amber.2
09-09-2005, 07:20 PM
try the local trash and treasure markets. see if you can find an old pair of binoculars ,pull to pieces and you'll find just what your looking for . goodluck

dr_zoidberg
10-09-2005, 11:02 AM
Off topic a bit, but regarding teaching kids about light... Many years ago a had a light "windmill" consisting of black "wind vane" balanced on a needle point, totally enclosed in a glass bulb. When you shone light on it the vane spun around -- thus demonstrating the dual wave/particle properties of light. :cool:
I've seen one of those, very interesting how they work. Our lecturer found it so interesting that he amused himself for 10 minutes playing with it on the overhead projector. :rolling:

luther
11-09-2005, 03:25 PM
I bought the prisms yesterday from Cam Art, and got three different shapes. Trying to get the colour spectrum clear is another thing altogether. I have tried different strength torches and making a narrow beam of light, but only with minimal success. I can get the coliurs coming up, but they are not really that clear. Unless someone knows exactly how to get themto work, it may be difficult for the chidlren to see!

Mind you, I have found anotehr trick. Just shine a torch on the back of a CD or DVD and watch how bright you can see colours! Now that actually works! :dD

dr_zoidberg
11-09-2005, 04:35 PM
hehehe nice to see you found a better solution after you went to all the effort of finding prisms. :rolling:


How close are you getting the torch to the prism? I can't remember high school physics that well, but I think having it closer or at a different angle helps. I'm not much use when it comes to light, if you need some help with fluid mechanics I can help out. :D

luther
12-09-2005, 09:21 PM
hehehe nice to see you found a better solution after you went to all the effort of finding prisms. :rolling:


How close are you getting the torch to the prism? I can't remember high school physics that well, but I think having it closer or at a different angle helps. I'm not much use when it comes to light, if you need some help with fluid mechanics I can help out. :D

Did the lesson today and they ate it up. Started with the laser pointer and spraying water in front. They loved it. Next I showed the back of a DVD and shone a torch for them to see the colours, then the prism. It was difficult to see, so I went to each table separately, and they could see it really well. Holding the torch up close (thanks!) worked well. Finished the lesson with them making a colour wheel, and some of them really worked well. Not bad for a Grade 2...

Now I'm working on a rocket, and have just tested it in my garage. It hit the roof, so they'll love that one on Thursday. The best part of being a student teacher is you can just teach some really fun lessons! :dD

jokiin
12-09-2005, 10:04 PM
New project eh? well we can help you find the gear for this one too, try here (http://www.nasa.gov/home/) :D

alex zorrilla
13-09-2005, 09:23 AM
Hey, be careful not to singe your eyebrows off like what happened to one of my friends' brothers. (He is fine now, thanks for asking).

If you want to try another project involving mechanical things or siege warfare, try looking here: http://www.trebuchet.com . You will probably end up with some annoyed parents, though. :rolleyes:

luther
14-09-2005, 07:34 AM
Love the ideas, but mine will simply involve a film cansiter, bi-carb soda, citric acid and water to launch the rocket - no ignition systems! :dD It's not the children I can't trust - it's me!

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