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View Full Version : How do you set up a VPN?



Ext User(Don J)
04-06-2007, 09:13 AM
I am interested in setting up a VPN. All the books I have that go into
details don't match what can actually be done. They are pretty bad. I need
some step by step
procedures. Among other things, how do you set the IP Address?

Don J

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ext User(Shenan Stanley)
04-06-2007, 09:43 AM
Don J wrote:
> I am interested in setting up a VPN. All the books I have that go
> into details don't match what can actually be done. They are
> pretty bad. I need some step by step
> procedures. Among other things, how do you set the IP Address?

See the response I already gave\ in the original thread this must have
formed from...

http://groups.google.com/group/microsoft.public.windowsxp.general/browse_thread/thread/d11fa4d3ec2746c6/ef6e81186d824176?lnk=st&q=&rnum=1#ef6e81186d824176

Server:
http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn_server.htm
Client:
http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn.htm

You could setup a Dynamic DNS account with someone like DynDNS.com and an
update client on one or both machines so that you only have to remember some
simplistic name instead of having to worry about getting the new IP
everytime the 'hotel-like institution' gives the machine a new address. ;-)

--
Shenan Stanley
MS-MVP
--
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

Ext User(Jack \(MVP-Networking\).)
04-06-2007, 10:33 AM
Hi
Just as a notion.
All of this VPN or otherwise, would pending on having two independent
Internet accounts (might be very costly way to share two LAN computers).
Clear this issue before you continue with any thing else.
Jack (MVP-Networking).

"Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:KMidnRFrmL8h1P7bnZ2dnUVZ_s6onZ2d@comcast.com. ..
>I am interested in setting up a VPN. All the books I have that go into
> details don't match what can actually be done. They are pretty bad. I
> need some step by step
> procedures. Among other things, how do you set the IP Address?
>
> Don J
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>

Ext User(Don J)
04-06-2007, 10:43 AM
Maybe VPN is not a good idea! A description of my problem which someone
suggested could be solved through VPN is as follows:

"I am currently accessing folders between two PCs using the shared folders
feature of Windows XP. The PC's are in the same room talking to each other
through a common modem, the other side of which is connected to the internet
through Comcast Cable.

I would like to move one of the PCs to another room. A direct connection
between the rooms is not possible. If the machines are going to talk to
each other it will have to be through Comcast Cable and the internet.

Is what I want to do even possible? How do I prevent unauthorized access?"

Your suggestions would be appreciated.

Don J

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


"Jack (MVP-Networking)." <Jack@discussiongroup.com> wrote in message
news:%23hi9l2jpHHA.2652@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> Hi
> Just as a notion.
> All of this VPN or otherwise, would pending on having two independent
> Internet accounts (might be very costly way to share two LAN computers).
> Clear this issue before you continue with any thing else.
> Jack (MVP-Networking).
>
> "Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:KMidnRFrmL8h1P7bnZ2dnUVZ_s6onZ2d@comcast.com. ..
>>I am interested in setting up a VPN. All the books I have that go into
>> details don't match what can actually be done. They are pretty bad. I
>> need some step by step
>> procedures. Among other things, how do you set the IP Address?
>>
>> Don J
>>
>> -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>
>
>

Ext User(GHalleck)
04-06-2007, 11:03 AM
Don J wrote:

> Maybe VPN is not a good idea! A description of my problem which someone
> suggested could be solved through VPN is as follows:
>
> "I am currently accessing folders between two PCs using the shared folders
> feature of Windows XP. The PC's are in the same room talking to each other
> through a common modem, the other side of which is connected to the internet
> through Comcast Cable.
>
> I would like to move one of the PCs to another room. A direct connection
> between the rooms is not possible. If the machines are going to talk to
> each other it will have to be through Comcast Cable and the internet.
>
> Is what I want to do even possible? How do I prevent unauthorized access?"
>
> Your suggestions would be appreciated.
>
> Don J

Just tossing out an idea because it seems so simple for a situation
like this...why not go wireless and a local intranet?

Ext User(Shenan Stanley)
04-06-2007, 11:23 AM
Jack (MVP-Networking). wrote:
> Just as a notion.
> All of this VPN or otherwise, would pending on having two
> independent Internet accounts (might be very costly way to share
> two LAN computers). Clear this issue before you continue with any
> thing else.

Don J wrote:
> Maybe VPN is not a good idea! A description of my problem which
> someone suggested could be solved through VPN is as follows:
<snipped - as it is listed below as original thread>

GHalleck wrote:
> Just tossing out an idea because it seems so simple for a situation
> like this...why not go wireless and a local intranet?

This is why I have no clue as to the reason for starting another post - it
has done nothing but complicate matters.

See the response I already gave in the original thread this must have
formed from...

http://groups.google.com/group/microsoft.public.windowsxp.general/browse_thread/thread/d11fa4d3ec2746c6/ef6e81186d824176?lnk=st&q=&rnum=1#ef6e81186d824176

Server:
http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn_server.htm
Client:
http://www.onecomputerguy.com/networking/xp_vpn.htm

You could setup a Dynamic DNS account with someone like DynDNS.com and an
update client on one or both machines so that you only have to remember some
simplistic name instead of having to worry about getting the new IP
everytime the 'hotel-like institution' gives the machine a new address. ;-)

So - either we are missing some information here (is it a 'hotel-like
institution' where each room is somehow separated from all other system
(firewalled) or something else? What exactly *is* what you are trying to
do? How do you get your IP? Will you be paying for each connection in each
'room' in this 'hotel-like institution' individually?

Please give as much detail about your situation as possible.

--
Shenan Stanley
MS-MVP
--
How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

Ext User(Patrick Keenan)
04-06-2007, 11:53 AM
"Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:6LOdnQaW-_aXw_7bnZ2dnUVZ_rqhnZ2d@comcast.com...
> Maybe VPN is not a good idea!

For what you are asking, with the information given, a VPN is *not* a good
idea.

Anything that takes you out on the internet for simply sharing files between
two machines on the same router is a bad idea. You will immediately drop
to about 1% of the possible speed.

If you have two machines using the same Cable internet connection, you must
already have a router. And that means you already have the ability to
share files. Run a cable to the other room, or get a wireless router and a
wireless card for the 2nd machine. For a standard wireless router, you'll
have at least 300 feet. If you get wireless N hardware, it's further.
Many hotels and offices that offer internet connection use this arrangement.

You can set up a VPN, but this isn't particularly simple, and it's
completely pointless if both systems use the same cable internet account and
can be on the same router. And that is where you need to look first.

HTH
-pk


<snippage>

Ext User(Don J)
04-06-2007, 12:13 PM
I get the message. Go wireless!

But what does that mean? Can I use a single wireless card plugged into each
PC? Or do I need a pair of wireless routers? How does each machine have
access to the internet? I'm not sure how it would all work.

Don J

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Patrick Keenan" <test@dev.null> wrote in message
news:eA0KRjkpHHA.588@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> "Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:6LOdnQaW-_aXw_7bnZ2dnUVZ_rqhnZ2d@comcast.com...
>> Maybe VPN is not a good idea!
>
> For what you are asking, with the information given, a VPN is *not* a good
> idea.
>
> Anything that takes you out on the internet for simply sharing files
> between two machines on the same router is a bad idea. You will
> immediately drop to about 1% of the possible speed.
>
> If you have two machines using the same Cable internet connection, you
> must already have a router. And that means you already have the ability
> to share files. Run a cable to the other room, or get a wireless router
> and a wireless card for the 2nd machine. For a standard wireless router,
> you'll have at least 300 feet. If you get wireless N hardware, it's
> further. Many hotels and offices that offer internet connection use this
> arrangement.
>
> You can set up a VPN, but this isn't particularly simple, and it's
> completely pointless if both systems use the same cable internet account
> and can be on the same router. And that is where you need to look first.
>
> HTH
> -pk
>
>
> <snippage>
>

Ext User(Patrick Keenan)
04-06-2007, 02:43 PM
"Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:GqSdnTERuMdF7v7bnZ2dnUVZ_t2tnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
>I get the message. Go wireless!
>
> But what does that mean? Can I use a single wireless card plugged into
> each PC? Or do I need a pair of wireless routers? How does each machine
> have access to the internet? I'm not sure how it would all work.
>
> Don J

OK, at this point, you need to provide more information about the internet
connection you have and how it gets to you, and the characteristics of the
premises.

You mention that this is a hotel-like building. How does the internet
service make the transition from the provider to your room? How far
apart are the rooms, and what is the physical structure of the building
like?

Normally, in an hotel context, an internet provider will essentially provide
one wire to the building, and then the building management will attach a
router to that, and run cables to each room. Or, they will provide
wireless service and you'll have login information.

And equally normally, in apartments or offices, internet providers usually
provide one wire to each apartment or office, and the tenants individually
deal with the service in their own space.

I will assume that at the moment, your systems are connected by a wire to
the existing internet connection, and that the service comes to your room.

To set up wireless, a simple thing is to get a wireless router - you only
need one - and a wireless network card for the system in the other room.
Plug the existing cable into the WAN or Internet port on the router, and
plug your PC into any of the switch ports. Follow the directions that come
with the router to configure it; this is usually very easy. You now have a
working router, working internet connection, and wireless capablity. And,
you have one PC connected by wire to the router. That's very important, as
wireless changes have to be made via wired connection.

Next, follow the directions to turn the wireless on. Be *sure* to change
the SSID - the name of the wireless network - right away, and set up an
encryption type. This will keep unauthorized people off your router. Copy
the encryption key, which may be 26 characters. It's not a bad idea to
save this to a text file, and put it on a USB key to copy it to the other
system.

Now, set up the wireless card on the soon-to-be-remote system. Do this
before you move it, so that there is no question of range being an issue.
It'll save a lot of walking, too.

Install the card, and drivers according to the directions. Set up the
wireless client to see your SSID (just search for networks) and give it the
encryption key from your router.

That's about it. Turn on file sharing, specify the folders, and you're
done. Move the machine to its destination.

The caveats from here arise from the structure of the building and the
distance between the router and the remote system. Wireless doesn't always
do well through large amounts of concrete and metal, so you need to know
about the building. Walking around with a laptop that you've set up to
connect to your wireless network can be an easy way to figure out what the
range is like. There are also external antennas you can get for both the
router and the remote PC to help improve transmission and reception.

On the other hand, the building's network access may give you better
options. Or, the ISP may be able to help you if they have a lot of cable
running to each room.

The solution may be very easy (like the wireless model above), or it may be
somewhat complex. I have no real idea, as we have so little information
about the premises.

In the end, you may need to consult with a local networking specialist. It
may be that you do have to run cable or work with the ISP or the router for
the building, and if that does look necessary you should get advice from
someone who has seen the premises.

HTH
-pk



> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> "Patrick Keenan" <test@dev.null> wrote in message
> news:eA0KRjkpHHA.588@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> "Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:6LOdnQaW-_aXw_7bnZ2dnUVZ_rqhnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>> Maybe VPN is not a good idea!
>>
>> For what you are asking, with the information given, a VPN is *not* a
>> good idea.
>>
>> Anything that takes you out on the internet for simply sharing files
>> between two machines on the same router is a bad idea. You will
>> immediately drop to about 1% of the possible speed.
>>
>> If you have two machines using the same Cable internet connection, you
>> must already have a router. And that means you already have the ability
>> to share files. Run a cable to the other room, or get a wireless router
>> and a wireless card for the 2nd machine. For a standard wireless
>> router, you'll have at least 300 feet. If you get wireless N hardware,
>> it's further. Many hotels and offices that offer internet connection use
>> this arrangement.
>>
>> You can set up a VPN, but this isn't particularly simple, and it's
>> completely pointless if both systems use the same cable internet account
>> and can be on the same router. And that is where you need to look
>> first.
>>
>> HTH
>> -pk
>>
>>
>> <snippage>
>>
>
>

Ext User(Jack \(MVP-Networking\).)
05-06-2007, 01:03 AM
Hi
Actually at this point you have to take a "breather" and start reading the
advice already given to you in your previous thread, coz otherwise every one
is going in circles.
Jack (MVP-Networking).

"Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:GqSdnTERuMdF7v7bnZ2dnUVZ_t2tnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
>I get the message. Go wireless!
>
> But what does that mean? Can I use a single wireless card plugged into
> each PC? Or do I need a pair of wireless routers? How does each machine
> have access to the internet? I'm not sure how it would all work.
>
> Don J
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> "Patrick Keenan" <test@dev.null> wrote in message
> news:eA0KRjkpHHA.588@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> "Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:6LOdnQaW-_aXw_7bnZ2dnUVZ_rqhnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>> Maybe VPN is not a good idea!
>>
>> For what you are asking, with the information given, a VPN is *not* a
>> good idea.
>>
>> Anything that takes you out on the internet for simply sharing files
>> between two machines on the same router is a bad idea. You will
>> immediately drop to about 1% of the possible speed.
>>
>> If you have two machines using the same Cable internet connection, you
>> must already have a router. And that means you already have the ability
>> to share files. Run a cable to the other room, or get a wireless router
>> and a wireless card for the 2nd machine. For a standard wireless
>> router, you'll have at least 300 feet. If you get wireless N hardware,
>> it's further. Many hotels and offices that offer internet connection use
>> this arrangement.
>>
>> You can set up a VPN, but this isn't particularly simple, and it's
>> completely pointless if both systems use the same cable internet account
>> and can be on the same router. And that is where you need to look
>> first.
>>
>> HTH
>> -pk
>>
>>
>> <snippage>
>>
>
>

Ext User(Don J)
05-06-2007, 03:39 AM
Thank You very much.

Don J

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Patrick Keenan" <test@dev.null> wrote in message
news:OkpxqFmpHHA.2156@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
> "Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:GqSdnTERuMdF7v7bnZ2dnUVZ_t2tnZ2d@comcast.com. ..
>>I get the message. Go wireless!
>>
>> But what does that mean? Can I use a single wireless card plugged into
>> each PC? Or do I need a pair of wireless routers? How does each machine
>> have access to the internet? I'm not sure how it would all work.
>>
>> Don J
>
> OK, at this point, you need to provide more information about the
> internet connection you have and how it gets to you, and the
> characteristics of the premises.
>
> You mention that this is a hotel-like building. How does the internet
> service make the transition from the provider to your room? How far
> apart are the rooms, and what is the physical structure of the building
> like?
>
> Normally, in an hotel context, an internet provider will essentially
> provide one wire to the building, and then the building management will
> attach a router to that, and run cables to each room. Or, they will
> provide wireless service and you'll have login information.
>
> And equally normally, in apartments or offices, internet providers usually
> provide one wire to each apartment or office, and the tenants individually
> deal with the service in their own space.
>
> I will assume that at the moment, your systems are connected by a wire to
> the existing internet connection, and that the service comes to your room.
>
> To set up wireless, a simple thing is to get a wireless router - you only
> need one - and a wireless network card for the system in the other room.
> Plug the existing cable into the WAN or Internet port on the router, and
> plug your PC into any of the switch ports. Follow the directions that
> come with the router to configure it; this is usually very easy. You now
> have a working router, working internet connection, and wireless
> capablity. And, you have one PC connected by wire to the router. That's
> very important, as wireless changes have to be made via wired connection.
>
> Next, follow the directions to turn the wireless on. Be *sure* to change
> the SSID - the name of the wireless network - right away, and set up an
> encryption type. This will keep unauthorized people off your router.
> Copy the encryption key, which may be 26 characters. It's not a bad idea
> to save this to a text file, and put it on a USB key to copy it to the
> other system.
>
> Now, set up the wireless card on the soon-to-be-remote system. Do this
> before you move it, so that there is no question of range being an issue.
> It'll save a lot of walking, too.
>
> Install the card, and drivers according to the directions. Set up the
> wireless client to see your SSID (just search for networks) and give it
> the encryption key from your router.
>
> That's about it. Turn on file sharing, specify the folders, and you're
> done. Move the machine to its destination.
>
> The caveats from here arise from the structure of the building and the
> distance between the router and the remote system. Wireless doesn't
> always do well through large amounts of concrete and metal, so you need to
> know about the building. Walking around with a laptop that you've set up
> to connect to your wireless network can be an easy way to figure out what
> the range is like. There are also external antennas you can get for both
> the router and the remote PC to help improve transmission and reception.
>
> On the other hand, the building's network access may give you better
> options. Or, the ISP may be able to help you if they have a lot of cable
> running to each room.
>
> The solution may be very easy (like the wireless model above), or it may
> be somewhat complex. I have no real idea, as we have so little
> information about the premises.
>
> In the end, you may need to consult with a local networking specialist.
> It may be that you do have to run cable or work with the ISP or the router
> for the building, and if that does look necessary you should get advice
> from someone who has seen the premises.
>
> HTH
> -pk
>
>
>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> "Patrick Keenan" <test@dev.null> wrote in message
>> news:eA0KRjkpHHA.588@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>>> "Don J" <dej8801@comcast.net> wrote in message
>>> news:6LOdnQaW-_aXw_7bnZ2dnUVZ_rqhnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>>> Maybe VPN is not a good idea!
>>>
>>> For what you are asking, with the information given, a VPN is *not* a
>>> good idea.
>>>
>>> Anything that takes you out on the internet for simply sharing files
>>> between two machines on the same router is a bad idea. You will
>>> immediately drop to about 1% of the possible speed.
>>>
>>> If you have two machines using the same Cable internet connection, you
>>> must already have a router. And that means you already have the
>>> ability to share files. Run a cable to the other room, or get a
>>> wireless router and a wireless card for the 2nd machine. For a
>>> standard wireless router, you'll have at least 300 feet. If you get
>>> wireless N hardware, it's further. Many hotels and offices that offer
>>> internet connection use this arrangement.
>>>
>>> You can set up a VPN, but this isn't particularly simple, and it's
>>> completely pointless if both systems use the same cable internet account
>>> and can be on the same router. And that is where you need to look
>>> first.
>>>
>>> HTH
>>> -pk
>>>
>>>
>>> <snippage>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

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