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Ext User(Craig)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
Hi folks..
Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail version of
win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND x32 bit versions on
the retail version so you can make up your own mind..

Thanks in advance

Craig

Ext User(Trev)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
"Craig" <nomail@notime.com> wrote in message
news:JZOdnWgt063AVmLXnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d@giganews.com...
> Hi folks..
> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail version
> of win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND x32 bit versions
> on the retail version so you can make up your own mind..
>
> Thanks in advance
>
> Craig
>
>
>

Its Not a rumour You do. But surly you can make up your mind before you buy
a OEM too and for a third of the cost.

Ext User(PvdG42)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
"Trev" <trevbowden@dsl.pipex.cominvalid> wrote in message
news:M4SdnY5KIf9hTmLXnZ2dnUVZ8hydnZ2d@pipex.net...
>
> "Craig" <nomail@notime.com> wrote in message
> news:JZOdnWgt063AVmLXnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d@giganews.com...
>> Hi folks..
>> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail version
>> of win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND x32 bit
>> versions on the retail version so you can make up your own mind..
>>
>> Thanks in advance
>>
>> Craig
>>
>>
>>
>
> Its Not a rumour You do. But surly you can make up your mind before you
> buy a OEM too and for a third of the cost.

True, but that's not the only difference between Retail and OEM. Two things
you don't get with OEM that nay affect your decision:

1. Support. When Microsoft sells an OEM license, the OEM (purchaser of the
license) is responsible for support, not Microsoft. So, if you're
comfortable with self-support, buy OEM.

2. Transferability. An OEM license is tied to the hardware on which it is
installed, while a retail license is transferable from one computer to
another. An OEM license does not allow you to *legally* install Win 7 on one
PC, then remove and then install it on a different computer using the same
license. If you have a new PC and plan to keep it for a while, OEM may make
sense.

Ext User(C)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
PvdG42 wrote:
>
> "Trev" <trevbowden@dsl.pipex.cominvalid> wrote in message
> news:M4SdnY5KIf9hTmLXnZ2dnUVZ8hydnZ2d@pipex.net...
>>
>> "Craig" <nomail@notime.com> wrote in message
>> news:JZOdnWgt063AVmLXnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d@giganews.com...
>>> Hi folks..
>>> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail
>>> version of win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND x32
>>> bit versions on the retail version so you can make up your own mind..
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance
>>>
>>> Craig
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> Its Not a rumour You do. But surly you can make up your mind before
>> you buy a OEM too and for a third of the cost.
>
> True, but that's not the only difference between Retail and OEM. Two
> things you don't get with OEM that nay affect your decision:
>
> 1. Support. When Microsoft sells an OEM license, the OEM (purchaser of
> the license) is responsible for support, not Microsoft. So, if you're
> comfortable with self-support, buy OEM.
>
> 2. Transferability. An OEM license is tied to the hardware on which it
> is installed, while a retail license is transferable from one computer
> to another. An OEM license does not allow you to *legally* install Win 7
> on one PC, then remove and then install it on a different computer using
> the same license. If you have a new PC and plan to keep it for a while,
> OEM may make sense.
>
>

I heard that if 120 days have past, the hardware hash for your computer
on MS servers is wiped clean and a new slate begins. As to whether it is
legal or not depends on the country's laws where you live and if and
when MS' EULA is ever taken to court and justified as legal. So one
*can* move an OEM copy from one computer to another although the
legality is not clear.

C

Ext User(Cash)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
C wrote:
> PvdG42 wrote:
>>
>> "Trev" <trevbowden@dsl.pipex.cominvalid> wrote in message
>> news:M4SdnY5KIf9hTmLXnZ2dnUVZ8hydnZ2d@pipex.net...
>>>
>>> "Craig" <nomail@notime.com> wrote in message
>>> news:JZOdnWgt063AVmLXnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d@giganews.com...
>>>> Hi folks..
>>>> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail
>>>> version of win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND
>>>> x32 bit versions on the retail version so you can make up your own
>>>> mind.. Thanks in advance
>>>>
>>>> Craig
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> Its Not a rumour You do. But surly you can make up your mind before
>>> you buy a OEM too and for a third of the cost.
>>
>> True, but that's not the only difference between Retail and OEM. Two
>> things you don't get with OEM that nay affect your decision:
>>
>> 1. Support. When Microsoft sells an OEM license, the OEM (purchaser
>> of the license) is responsible for support, not Microsoft. So, if
>> you're comfortable with self-support, buy OEM.
>>
>> 2. Transferability. An OEM license is tied to the hardware on which
>> it is installed, while a retail license is transferable from one
>> computer to another. An OEM license does not allow you to *legally*
>> install Win 7 on one PC, then remove and then install it on a
>> different computer using the same license. If you have a new PC and
>> plan to keep it for a while, OEM may make sense.
>>
>>
>
> I heard that if 120 days have past, the hardware hash for your
> computer on MS servers is wiped clean and a new slate begins. As to
> whether it is legal or not depends on the country's laws where you
> live and if and when MS' EULA is ever taken to court and justified as
> legal. So one *can* move an OEM copy from one computer to another
> although the legality is not clear.
>
> C

I have done that and, when the internet activation failed, a simple
telephone call with an automatic response got thing working on the new
computer. N.B. this was using the XP Home disk.

Ext User(Jack Gillis)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
Craig wrote:
> Hi folks..
> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail version of
> win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND x32 bit versions on
> the retail version so you can make up your own mind..
>
> Thanks in advance
>
> Craig
>
>
>
My OEM from New Egg contained 2 disk. 1 64bit and the other 32bit

Ext User(Student)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
>>
> My OEM from New Egg contained 2 disk. 1 64bit and the other 32bit


My OEM was one disk

However I did order the special promotional upgrade package which I ordered
in June.

It is to upgrade my daughters vista. It came with 2 disk 32 and 64 bit.

I made an Acronis image of my system and tried both these versions on my
computer. I did not enter the key and activate.

After trying both I decided 32 bit was fine for me.

I then bought a 32 bit OEM home premium and did a fresh installation.

64 bit has a larger foot print.

ES

Ext User(Craig)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
"Craig" <nomail@notime.com> wrote in message
news:JZOdnWgt063AVmLXnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d@giganews.com...
> Hi folks..
> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail version
> of win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND x32 bit versions
> on the retail version so you can make up your own mind..
>
> Thanks in advance
>
> Craig
>
>
>
>

Thanks for all your help folks..:-)

Ext User(C)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
Cash wrote:
> C wrote:
>> PvdG42 wrote:
>>> "Trev" <trevbowden@dsl.pipex.cominvalid> wrote in message
>>> news:M4SdnY5KIf9hTmLXnZ2dnUVZ8hydnZ2d@pipex.net...
>>>> "Craig" <nomail@notime.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:JZOdnWgt063AVmLXnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d@giganews.com...
>>>>> Hi folks..
>>>>> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail
>>>>> version of win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND
>>>>> x32 bit versions on the retail version so you can make up your own
>>>>> mind.. Thanks in advance
>>>>>
>>>>> Craig
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> Its Not a rumour You do. But surly you can make up your mind before
>>>> you buy a OEM too and for a third of the cost.
>>> True, but that's not the only difference between Retail and OEM. Two
>>> things you don't get with OEM that nay affect your decision:
>>>
>>> 1. Support. When Microsoft sells an OEM license, the OEM (purchaser
>>> of the license) is responsible for support, not Microsoft. So, if
>>> you're comfortable with self-support, buy OEM.
>>>
>>> 2. Transferability. An OEM license is tied to the hardware on which
>>> it is installed, while a retail license is transferable from one
>>> computer to another. An OEM license does not allow you to *legally*
>>> install Win 7 on one PC, then remove and then install it on a
>>> different computer using the same license. If you have a new PC and
>>> plan to keep it for a while, OEM may make sense.
>>>
>>>
>> I heard that if 120 days have past, the hardware hash for your
>> computer on MS servers is wiped clean and a new slate begins. As to
>> whether it is legal or not depends on the country's laws where you
>> live and if and when MS' EULA is ever taken to court and justified as
>> legal. So one *can* move an OEM copy from one computer to another
>> although the legality is not clear.
>>
>> C
>
> I have done that and, when the internet activation failed, a simple
> telephone call with an automatic response got thing working on the new
> computer. N.B. this was using the XP Home disk.
>
>

Was it less than 120 days since the last activation/genuinization or
hardware change?

C

Ext User(JJG)
04-10-2011, 12:30 AM
You are absolute right. I was mixed up with a full version I ordered
from Amazon.

Student wrote:
>
>
>>>
>> My OEM from New Egg contained 2 disk. 1 64bit and the other 32bit
>
>
> My OEM was one disk
>
> However I did order the special promotional upgrade package which I ordered
> in June.
>
> It is to upgrade my daughters vista. It came with 2 disk 32 and 64 bit.
>
> I made an Acronis image of my system and tried both these versions on my
> computer. I did not enter the key and activate.
>
> After trying both I decided 32 bit was fine for me.
>
> I then bought a 32 bit OEM home premium and did a fresh installation.
>
> 64 bit has a larger foot print.
>
> ES

Ext User(Brian W)
04-10-2011, 12:31 AM
"PvdG42" <pvdg42@toadstool.edu> wrote in message
news:FmVLm.36532$%j4.12499@newsfe18.iad...
>
> "Trev" <trevbowden@dsl.pipex.cominvalid> wrote in message
> news:M4SdnY5KIf9hTmLXnZ2dnUVZ8hydnZ2d@pipex.net...
>>
>> "Craig" <nomail@notime.com> wrote in message
>> news:JZOdnWgt063AVmLXnZ2dnUVZ_r-dnZ2d@giganews.com...
>>> Hi folks..
>>> Ant truth to the rumour that if you buy the retail version
>>> of win 7 compared to the oem version,you get both x64 AND x32 bit
>>> versions on the retail version so you can make up your own mind..
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance
>>>
>>> Craig
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> Its Not a rumour You do. But surly you can make up your mind before you
>> buy a OEM too and for a third of the cost.
>
> True, but that's not the only difference between Retail and OEM. Two
> things you don't get with OEM that nay affect your decision:
>
> 1. Support. When Microsoft sells an OEM license, the OEM (purchaser of the
> license) is responsible for support, not Microsoft. So, if you're
> comfortable with self-support, buy OEM.
>
> 2. Transferability. An OEM license is tied to the hardware on which it is
> installed, while a retail license is transferable from one computer to
> another. An OEM license does not allow you to *legally* install Win 7 on
> one PC, then remove and then install it on a different computer using the
> same license. If you have a new PC and plan to keep it for a while, OEM
> may make sense.

But the PC can be 'upgraded' ad infinitum without any problems. Even
changing the motherboard or HDD can be considered an 'upgrade', despite what
MS may say!
I did loads of 'upgrades' with OEM Vista (using retail Win 7 now)

Ext User(Gordon)
04-10-2011, 12:31 AM
"Brian W" <brian.wescombeSODOFF@ntlSPAMworld.com> wrote in message
news:dcVMm.48905$eE7.6764@newsfe17.ams2...
>
> But the PC can be 'upgraded' ad infinitum without any problems. Even
> changing the motherboard or HDD can be considered an 'upgrade', despite
> what MS may say!
> I did loads of 'upgrades' with OEM Vista (using retail Win 7 now)
>
>

MS doesn't actually say anywhere, what constitutes a "new" computer....

Ext User(Brian W)
04-10-2011, 12:31 AM
"Gordon" <gordonbparker@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1u2dnfakpfJogpnWnZ2dnUVZ7sKdnZ2d@eclipse.net. uk...
>
> "Brian W" <brian.wescombeSODOFF@ntlSPAMworld.com> wrote in message
> news:dcVMm.48905$eE7.6764@newsfe17.ams2...
>>
>> But the PC can be 'upgraded' ad infinitum without any problems. Even
>> changing the motherboard or HDD can be considered an 'upgrade', despite
>> what MS may say!
>> I did loads of 'upgrades' with OEM Vista (using retail Win 7 now)
>>
>>
>
> MS doesn't actually say anywhere, what constitutes a "new" computer....

Exactly :-)

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