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Ext User(Jim)
05-10-2011, 07:38 PM
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 02:01:55 +0000, John Doe wrote:

> Matt <matt@themattfella.xxxyyz.com> wrote:
>
> Even though I realize that arguing anything with a Linux Lunatic is an
> exercise in futility, would you like to go to various stores and see
> what's available for windows versus Linux? I enjoy shopping online, and
> of course I can easily show you that squat is available for Linux
> compared to what's available for Windows. And, in case you still don't
> get it, applications are what matter. That's why we are called "users"
> because we use applications, we don't just mess around with an operating
> system.
>
> Any active user of a PC should go to the store and see how many of his
> (or her) applications are available for Linux before even thinking about
> dumping Windows.
>
> But of course, you can't buy Linux applications in stores because it's
> all free. And the cow jumped over the moon.

You are long overdue to try a modern Linux distribution. We have plenty
of software available. Difference is you buy shrink wrapped software and
hope it works. The Linux user downloads his from one or more
repositories. Why go to a store?

We can also have multiple same purpose applications installed
simultaneously to see which one we prefer without any of them fighting
for dominance.

Then should we decide to uninstall some of them, our systems don't suffer
from the "Unplug 'n Pray" realities of Windows.

Bottom line to all of this is most current Linux users previously used
Windows. After becoming disillusioned we sought out solutions. With
Linux we found systems that simply work without all the grief.

Linux Lunatic? Nope, Linux Aware.

Ext User(Matt)
05-10-2011, 07:38 PM
Jim wrote:
> On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 02:01:55 +0000, John Doe wrote:
>
>> Matt <matt@themattfella.xxxyyz.com> wrote:
>>
>> Even though I realize that arguing anything with a Linux Lunatic is an
>> exercise in futility, would you like to go to various stores and see
>> what's available for windows versus Linux? I enjoy shopping online, and
>> of course I can easily show you that squat is available for Linux
>> compared to what's available for Windows. And, in case you still don't
>> get it, applications are what matter. That's why we are called "users"
>> because we use applications, we don't just mess around with an operating
>> system.
>>
>> Any active user of a PC should go to the store and see how many of his
>> (or her) applications are available for Linux before even thinking about
>> dumping Windows.
>>
>> But of course, you can't buy Linux applications in stores because it's
>> all free. And the cow jumped over the moon.


I didn't write any of that.

Ext User(Matt)
05-10-2011, 07:38 PM
Jim wrote:
> On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 02:01:55 +0000, John Doe wrote:
>
>> Matt <matt@themattfella.xxxyyz.com> wrote:
>>
>> Even though I realize that arguing anything with a Linux Lunatic is an
>> exercise in futility, would you like to go to various stores and see
>> what's available for windows versus Linux? I enjoy shopping online, and
>> of course I can easily show you that squat is available for Linux
>> compared to what's available for Windows. And, in case you still don't
>> get it, applications are what matter. That's why we are called "users"
>> because we use applications, we don't just mess around with an operating
>> system.
>>
>> Any active user of a PC should go to the store and see how many of his
>> (or her) applications are available for Linux before even thinking about
>> dumping Windows.
>>
>> But of course, you can't buy Linux applications in stores because it's
>> all free. And the cow jumped over the moon.


I didn't write any of that.

Ext User(Matt)
05-10-2011, 07:38 PM
John Doe wrote:
> Matt <matt@themattfella.xxxyyz.com> wrote:
>
> <snipped lots of Linux spam>
>
>> Now post my header.
>
> I did, as spam. You're trying to sell something mainstream PC users
> cannot use.


Have a good doctor check the blood supply to your brain.

Ext User(Matt)
05-10-2011, 07:38 PM
John Doe wrote:
> Matt <matt@themattfella.xxxyyz.com> wrote:
>
> <snipped lots of Linux spam>
>
>> Now post my header.
>
> I did, as spam. You're trying to sell something mainstream PC users
> cannot use.


Have a good doctor check the blood supply to your brain.

Ext User(Matt)
05-10-2011, 07:38 PM
Benjamin Gawert wrote:
> * Matt:
>
>>> Ok. Then tell me how do another say 500000 new Linux computers
>>> running OpenOffice help to develop new software for Linux?
>>>
>>> The question is valid because that's what the majority of Linux
>>> desktops you mentioned are used for: generic office tasks.
>>
>> It is a silly question for one desktop or a million. But the question
>> is more than a million times sillier for a million desktops than it is
>> for one desktop. If you still don't understand, say so, and I will
>> give a less cryptic answer. Really, though, you ought to be able to
>> give the answer yourself.
>
> So in short you don't have a damn clue. Well, can't say I didn't expect
> that since your view seems to be quite limited.


You haven't done well at all.

Of course the issue is complex, but I will try to hit some of the high
points.

People who build software want the software to be used so that they can
get more back (e.g. license fees, donations, salary, recognition) and so
others can get benefits from the software. How much new software is
being written for CP/M? When more computers run a given OS, it is more
likely that software will be written for that OS.

More Linux PCs at work and school means more Linux apps at work and
school. Really hardly anybody could be so dense as to not understand that.


HOW LINUX WILL SPREAD FROM WORK AND SCHOOL TO HOME

There are classes of applications that are useful at work, at school,
and at home. Browser, email, and office software (Firefox, Thunderbird,
and OpenOffice) are obvious examples. When there is increased Linux use
at work and at school, developers will become more likely to build
cross-platform apps (rather than Windows-only apps) that can be used at
work, at school, and at home. Since that will bring more apps that can
be used on Linux at home, Linux adoption at home will increase. When
enough apps are built cross-platform, the OSes can compete mainly on
their intrinsic merits rather than mainly on the merits of the available
apps.

Bonus point: For very many technologies, there is a sequence of
technology adoption that goes roughly like: military, government, large
company, small company, home. Linux is now building its footholds in
the military, government, school, and large-company domains.

Bonus point: For the next several years, the biggest cost savings will
be from actual or threatened Linux migrations by large operations
(school systems, governments, corporations). These will decrease MS
revenue tens of millions of dollars at a time. The costs of Windows and
Office development will fall increasingly on the shoulders of small
companies and home users and will increase the incentive for the small
user to move to Linux.


> So for you: yes, there is an answer, and the answer is that doesn't
> help. FYI: new software gets usually created out of a demand. New office
> PCs, no matter what OS they run, don't lead to a demand, simply because
> the necessary software (in this case OOo) is already there.
>
> I really suggest you go out and learn something about how corporates
> work and see how their decisions are driven, you will be surprised. And
> if you learned about that come back and tell us again how companies
> deploying office PCs running Linux will be revolutionary to the home user.
>
> EOT
>
> Benjamin

Ext User(Matt)
05-10-2011, 07:38 PM
Benjamin Gawert wrote:
> * Matt:
>
>>> Ok. Then tell me how do another say 500000 new Linux computers
>>> running OpenOffice help to develop new software for Linux?
>>>
>>> The question is valid because that's what the majority of Linux
>>> desktops you mentioned are used for: generic office tasks.
>>
>> It is a silly question for one desktop or a million. But the question
>> is more than a million times sillier for a million desktops than it is
>> for one desktop. If you still don't understand, say so, and I will
>> give a less cryptic answer. Really, though, you ought to be able to
>> give the answer yourself.
>
> So in short you don't have a damn clue. Well, can't say I didn't expect
> that since your view seems to be quite limited.


You haven't done well at all.

Of course the issue is complex, but I will try to hit some of the high
points.

People who build software want the software to be used so that they can
get more back (e.g. license fees, donations, salary, recognition) and so
others can get benefits from the software. How much new software is
being written for CP/M? When more computers run a given OS, it is more
likely that software will be written for that OS.

More Linux PCs at work and school means more Linux apps at work and
school. Really hardly anybody could be so dense as to not understand that.


HOW LINUX WILL SPREAD FROM WORK AND SCHOOL TO HOME

There are classes of applications that are useful at work, at school,
and at home. Browser, email, and office software (Firefox, Thunderbird,
and OpenOffice) are obvious examples. When there is increased Linux use
at work and at school, developers will become more likely to build
cross-platform apps (rather than Windows-only apps) that can be used at
work, at school, and at home. Since that will bring more apps that can
be used on Linux at home, Linux adoption at home will increase. When
enough apps are built cross-platform, the OSes can compete mainly on
their intrinsic merits rather than mainly on the merits of the available
apps.

Bonus point: For very many technologies, there is a sequence of
technology adoption that goes roughly like: military, government, large
company, small company, home. Linux is now building its footholds in
the military, government, school, and large-company domains.

Bonus point: For the next several years, the biggest cost savings will
be from actual or threatened Linux migrations by large operations
(school systems, governments, corporations). These will decrease MS
revenue tens of millions of dollars at a time. The costs of Windows and
Office development will fall increasingly on the shoulders of small
companies and home users and will increase the incentive for the small
user to move to Linux.


> So for you: yes, there is an answer, and the answer is that doesn't
> help. FYI: new software gets usually created out of a demand. New office
> PCs, no matter what OS they run, don't lead to a demand, simply because
> the necessary software (in this case OOo) is already there.
>
> I really suggest you go out and learn something about how corporates
> work and see how their decisions are driven, you will be surprised. And
> if you learned about that come back and tell us again how companies
> deploying office PCs running Linux will be revolutionary to the home user.
>
> EOT
>
> Benjamin

Ext User(Jim)
05-10-2011, 07:39 PM
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 11:29:29 -0500, Matt wrote:

>
>
> I didn't write any of that.

Sorry Matt, should have gone up another line or two. Should have shown
as a response to John Doe.

Ext User(Jim)
05-10-2011, 07:39 PM
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 11:29:29 -0500, Matt wrote:

>
>
> I didn't write any of that.

Sorry Matt, should have gone up another line or two. Should have shown
as a response to John Doe.

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