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Thread: Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

  1. #21
    Ext User(Gene E. Bloch) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 16:31:16 +0100, Bob H wrote:

    > What puzzles me most is the fact that windows tells me that the devices
    > are working properly, yet the sound device is clearly not or at least
    > something to do with it is not.


    No puzzle. Windows only knows that the software (drivers) returns no
    error codes. Windows has no ears :-)

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)

  2. #22
    Ext User(Gene E. Bloch) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 14:42:29 +0100, Bob H wrote:

    > I have already tried and read up on what others have said/suggested, and
    > the problem seems to be linked to thee conextant modem in that both that
    > and the sound device are located at Location 65535.


    Perhaps the modem uses the sound card to generate the signals it sends
    to the phone line or internet line. Like what used to be called a
    "Windows modem".

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)

  3. #23
    Ext User(Bob H) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On 17/08/2013 23:29, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    > On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 14:42:29 +0100, Bob H wrote:
    >
    >> I have already tried and read up on what others have said/suggested, and
    >> the problem seems to be linked to thee conextant modem in that both that
    >> and the sound device are located at Location 65535.

    >
    > Perhaps the modem uses the sound card to generate the signals it sends
    > to the phone line or internet line. Like what used to be called a
    > "Windows modem".
    >

    Yes I remember them, and thankfully never had nor used one.

  4. #24
    Ext User(Gene E. Bloch) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 23:42:24 +0100, Bob H wrote:

    > On 17/08/2013 23:29, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >> On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 14:42:29 +0100, Bob H wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have already tried and read up on what others have said/suggested, and
    >>> the problem seems to be linked to thee conextant modem in that both that
    >>> and the sound device are located at Location 65535.

    >>
    >> Perhaps the modem uses the sound card to generate the signals it sends
    >> to the phone line or internet line. Like what used to be called a
    >> "Windows modem".
    >>

    > Yes I remember them, and thankfully never had nor used one.


    Yes. I avoided them like the plague.

    It might have been superstition on my part, but IIRC, there were good
    reasons to avoid them.

    But it's been a while, so maybe I don't recall correctly any more :-)

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)

  5. #25
    Ext User(J. P. Gilliver (John)) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    In message <9dtpk91i9bxp.dlg@stumbler1907.invalid>, Gene E. Bloch
    <not-me@other.invalid> writes:
    >On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 23:42:24 +0100, Bob H wrote:
    >
    >> On 17/08/2013 23:29, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 14:42:29 +0100, Bob H wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I have already tried and read up on what others have said/suggested, and
    >>>> the problem seems to be linked to thee conextant modem in that both that
    >>>> and the sound device are located at Location 65535.
    >>>
    >>> Perhaps the modem uses the sound card to generate the signals it sends
    >>> to the phone line or internet line. Like what used to be called a
    >>> "Windows modem".


    Not entirely. A "WinModem" was basically just a D-to-A and an A-to-D for
    the 'phone line, but it usually _was_ separate from the sound card.
    (There _were_ devices that used the same hardware for both, but they
    weren't common.)
    >>>

    >> Yes I remember them, and thankfully never had nor used one.

    >
    >Yes. I avoided them like the plague.
    >
    >It might have been superstition on my part, but IIRC, there were good
    >reasons to avoid them.


    The main one was that, as they had little circuitry of their own to
    generate and demodulate waveforms, they relied on the main processor;
    this took processing time from whatever else was being done, and wasn't
    too reliable with the limited-power processors of the time. With modern
    powerful processors, they would likely work well no problem; however,
    dialup itself is much in decline. (There was a time when it began to
    look as if a built-in MoDem was going to be as common as a built-in IDE
    controller; these were I suppose replaced by the ethernet port as a
    default built-in.)
    >
    >But it's been a while, so maybe I don't recall correctly any more :-)
    >

    --
    J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

    Sarcasm: Barbed ire

  6. #26
    Ext User(Paul) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    > In message <9dtpk91i9bxp.dlg@stumbler1907.invalid>, Gene E. Bloch
    > <not-me@other.invalid> writes:
    >> On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 23:42:24 +0100, Bob H wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 17/08/2013 23:29, Gene E. Bloch wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 17 Aug 2013 14:42:29 +0100, Bob H wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I have already tried and read up on what others have
    >>>>> said/suggested, and
    >>>>> the problem seems to be linked to thee conextant modem in that both
    >>>>> that
    >>>>> and the sound device are located at Location 65535.
    >>>>
    >>>> Perhaps the modem uses the sound card to generate the signals it sends
    >>>> to the phone line or internet line. Like what used to be called a
    >>>> "Windows modem".

    >
    > Not entirely. A "WinModem" was basically just a D-to-A and an A-to-D for
    > the 'phone line, but it usually _was_ separate from the sound card.
    > (There _were_ devices that used the same hardware for both, but they
    > weren't common.)
    >>>>
    >>> Yes I remember them, and thankfully never had nor used one.

    >>
    >> Yes. I avoided them like the plague.
    >>
    >> It might have been superstition on my part, but IIRC, there were good
    >> reasons to avoid them.

    >
    > The main one was that, as they had little circuitry of their own to
    > generate and demodulate waveforms, they relied on the main processor;
    > this took processing time from whatever else was being done, and wasn't
    > too reliable with the limited-power processors of the time. With modern
    > powerful processors, they would likely work well no problem; however,
    > dialup itself is much in decline. (There was a time when it began to
    > look as if a built-in MoDem was going to be as common as a built-in IDE
    > controller; these were I suppose replaced by the ethernet port as a
    > default built-in.)
    >>
    >> But it's been a while, so maybe I don't recall correctly any more :-)
    >>


    The Winmodem, needs a "couple hundred megahertz" worth of DSP
    processing activity, to decode the dialup modem bits coming
    in via the frequency domain from the modem setup.

    You're right, in that hardware-wise, the dialup modem needs only
    an A-to-D and a D-to-A, as well as a data access arrangement (DAA)
    for safely connecting a low voltage PC, to a high voltage and
    dangerous telephone network. When the Central Office puts a 180V
    20Hz ringer signal on the line, you don't want that going into the
    A-to-D. So the Data Access Arrangement, has a transformer, and
    the circuits necessary to clamp transients before they get to the
    A-to-D.

    In the case of the OPs computer, as far as I know, the Conexant
    chip sits on the same bus as the sound chip. Like this

    Southbridge
    | |
    | +---------+
    | |
    HDAudio HDAudio
    5.1 channel Conexant
    Audio A-to-D and
    D-to-A for
    dialup DAA

    On the Southbridge, there are high speed serial interfaces for
    HDAudio. In one direction, the bus is multi-drop. In the
    other direction, each HDAudio device has its own private pin.
    The Southbridge may have enough pins for three devices (I'd
    have to download a datasheet, to count them). In any case,
    there should be room for at least two devices (system audio,
    as well as HDAudio WinModem).

    The devices are supposed to support enumeration and Plug and Play.
    Which is why that 65535 thing should disappear when the driver
    is installed, and a more natural "English phrase" in Device Manager,
    should describe the Conexant chip.

    If this was a hardware failure, the output channels should
    fail independently. So if you had a stereo speaker setup,
    maybe static electricity would blow out the Left or the
    Right signal. But not both at once. If enough energy was
    involved, to affect multiple outputs, it would also
    tend to affect enumeration of the device. And you'd have
    no sound chip listed at all. That's why, for me at least,
    that makes it hard to believe it's a hardware failure.
    Silicon hardly ever fails "in the middle of a chip". It
    can fail at the edges, due to static electricity.

    We already have a precedent, in the form of the ICH5 failures though,
    where the bond wires burning on the power to the I/O pins
    (the USB failure problem), and all the USB I/O dies at the
    same time. But in that case, we have a good number of chips
    with a big burn mark in the center of them. If this was a
    design flaw in the OPs hardware, then we'd expect to find audio
    chips dropping like flies. Just like, I've read maybe
    25 threads about burned ICH5s. When it first started
    happening, there was a fair cluster of reports all at
    once. It's a good thing my ICH5 never blew, as I'd
    be pissed (the motherboard it's on, wasn't cheap). Intel
    never admitted a problem with that chip, but I suspect
    something was going on behind the scenes.

    (Static electricity can do this... eventually. The burn mark
    is over top of the bond wires that power USB I/O pads. All
    your USB I/O dies at the connector, but Device Manager looks
    perfect!)

    http://i.onfinite.com/TFG42bkgd.jpg

    Paul

  7. #27
    Ext User(J. P. Gilliver (John)) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    In message <kupa5i$dhn$1@dont-email.me>, Paul <nospam@needed.com>
    writes:
    >J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

    []
    >> Not entirely. A "WinModem" was basically just a D-to-A and an A-to-D
    >>for the 'phone line, but it usually _was_ separate from the sound
    >>card. (There _were_ devices that used the same hardware for both, but
    >>they weren't common.)

    []
    >> The main one was that, as they had little circuitry of their own to
    >>generate and demodulate waveforms, they relied on the main processor;
    >>this took processing time from whatever else was being done, and
    >>wasn't too reliable with the limited-power processors of the time.

    []
    >The Winmodem, needs a "couple hundred megahertz" worth of DSP
    >processing activity, to decode the dialup modem bits coming
    >in via the frequency domain from the modem setup.
    >
    >You're right, in that hardware-wise, the dialup modem needs only
    >an A-to-D and a D-to-A, as well as a data access arrangement (DAA)
    >for safely connecting a low voltage PC, to a high voltage and
    >dangerous telephone network. When the Central Office puts a 180V
    >20Hz ringer signal on the line, you don't want that going into the
    >A-to-D. So the Data Access Arrangement, has a transformer, and
    >the circuits necessary to clamp transients before they get to the
    >A-to-D.


    True, there's all the protection stuff. When I was writing the above, I
    also wondered about mentioning the relay that is necessary to implement
    pulse dialling, but didn't as I wasn't sure all WinModems implemented
    pulse dialling.
    []
    >If this was a hardware failure, the output channels should
    >fail independently. So if you had a stereo speaker setup,
    >maybe static electricity would blow out the Left or the
    >Right signal. But not both at once. If enough energy was


    That thought did also occur to me. I wasn't (am) not sufficiently
    familiar with the architecture of that area to know whether there's a
    separate amplifier chip (or two), or whether it's part of the same piece
    of silicon as does the digital stuff; though even if it is, I could
    envisage the possibility of just the analogue part being dead. (Wouldn't
    _have_ to be static: could be overload, due to too much heavy rock being
    played, especially if into a short. I _think_ _sometimes_ there's a
    series resistor in series with the output socket [but possibly not the
    internal speakers?] to protect the output device, but if the switching
    in the socket is faulty, that could be bypassed.) Such a cause could
    take out, for example, the supply wire (even - probably especially -
    inside the silicon) to both amplifier sections.

    >involved, to affect multiple outputs, it would also
    >tend to affect enumeration of the device. And you'd have
    >no sound chip listed at all. That's why, for me at least,
    >that makes it hard to believe it's a hardware failure.
    >Silicon hardly ever fails "in the middle of a chip". It
    >can fail at the edges, due to static electricity.


    I _tend_ to agree: a driver failure/problem seems most likely,
    especially with them both appearing on the same address (I admit I'm not
    following that aspect too closely, though the number being 65535 - FF -
    does sound suspicious). When someone suggested trying a boot disc from
    another OS, I thought that was a good idea; however, Andy has tried
    several with little success, so I think it's a matter of how much time
    he's willing to spend on fixing this laptop for a friend. Of course the
    external "sound card" will require speakers, thus making the whole thing
    less portable.

    I think it's likely to be either a driver/setup problem, or a faulty
    (or, more likely, just disconnected) socket. (Though that'd normally
    just affect one channel - initially, though could get to both in time.)
    I don't think he's said categorically that there isn't a continuous
    faint hiss when headphones are used; that would be interesting to know.

    It'd also be useful - I _think_ - to know whether the MoDem "works", i.
    e. whether if you plug it into a 'phoneline and tell it to dial, you
    hear anything on a 'phone on the same line - or hear the relay doing
    clunka-clunka-clunka if you tell it to pulse dial. However, I'm not sure
    what it would tell us if it does work - probably at least that the
    Southbridge onward communication is OK (but I don't know what else is on
    there - probably other parts of the PC wouldn't be working if it
    wasn't), and if it doesn't it could just be part of the same driver
    setup problem.
    >
    >We already have a precedent, in the form of the ICH5 failures though,
    >where the bond wires burning on the power to the I/O pins
    >(the USB failure problem), and all the USB I/O dies at the
    >same time. But in that case, we have a good number of chips
    >with a big burn mark in the center of them. If this was a
    >design flaw in the OPs hardware, then we'd expect to find audio
    >chips dropping like flies. Just like, I've read maybe


    Well, not if some previous owner/user has shorted the outputs ...
    []
    >(Static electricity can do this... eventually. The burn mark
    >is over top of the bond wires that power USB I/O pads. All
    >your USB I/O dies at the connector, but Device Manager looks
    >perfect!)


    And a dud audio output stage would still make the "sound card" appear OK
    in DM. But I agree this is less likely - though certainly possible! -
    than a driver/setup problem, or a socket solder break.
    --
    J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

    Sarcasm: Barbed ire

  8. #28
    Ext User(Paul) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    > In message <kupa5i$dhn$1@dont-email.me>, Paul <nospam@needed.com> writes:
    >> J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

    > []
    >>> Not entirely. A "WinModem" was basically just a D-to-A and an A-to-D
    >>> for the 'phone line, but it usually _was_ separate from the sound
    >>> card. (There _were_ devices that used the same hardware for both,
    >>> but they weren't common.)

    > []
    >>> The main one was that, as they had little circuitry of their own to
    >>> generate and demodulate waveforms, they relied on the main processor;
    >>> this took processing time from whatever else was being done, and
    >>> wasn't too reliable with the limited-power processors of the time.

    > []
    >> The Winmodem, needs a "couple hundred megahertz" worth of DSP
    >> processing activity, to decode the dialup modem bits coming
    >> in via the frequency domain from the modem setup.
    >>
    >> You're right, in that hardware-wise, the dialup modem needs only
    >> an A-to-D and a D-to-A, as well as a data access arrangement (DAA)
    >> for safely connecting a low voltage PC, to a high voltage and
    >> dangerous telephone network. When the Central Office puts a 180V
    >> 20Hz ringer signal on the line, you don't want that going into the
    >> A-to-D. So the Data Access Arrangement, has a transformer, and
    >> the circuits necessary to clamp transients before they get to the
    >> A-to-D.

    >
    > True, there's all the protection stuff. When I was writing the above, I
    > also wondered about mentioning the relay that is necessary to implement
    > pulse dialling, but didn't as I wasn't sure all WinModems implemented
    > pulse dialling.
    > []
    >> If this was a hardware failure, the output channels should
    >> fail independently. So if you had a stereo speaker setup,
    >> maybe static electricity would blow out the Left or the
    >> Right signal. But not both at once. If enough energy was

    >
    > That thought did also occur to me. I wasn't (am) not sufficiently
    > familiar with the architecture of that area to know whether there's a
    > separate amplifier chip (or two), or whether it's part of the same piece
    > of silicon as does the digital stuff; though even if it is, I could
    > envisage the possibility of just the analogue part being dead. (Wouldn't
    > _have_ to be static: could be overload, due to too much heavy rock being
    > played, especially if into a short. I _think_ _sometimes_ there's a
    > series resistor in series with the output socket [but possibly not the
    > internal speakers?] to protect the output device, but if the switching
    > in the socket is faulty, that could be bypassed.) Such a cause could
    > take out, for example, the supply wire (even - probably especially -
    > inside the silicon) to both amplifier sections.
    >
    >> involved, to affect multiple outputs, it would also
    >> tend to affect enumeration of the device. And you'd have
    >> no sound chip listed at all. That's why, for me at least,
    >> that makes it hard to believe it's a hardware failure.
    >> Silicon hardly ever fails "in the middle of a chip". It
    >> can fail at the edges, due to static electricity.

    >
    > I _tend_ to agree: a driver failure/problem seems most likely,
    > especially with them both appearing on the same address (I admit I'm not
    > following that aspect too closely, though the number being 65535 - FF -
    > does sound suspicious). When someone suggested trying a boot disc from
    > another OS, I thought that was a good idea; however, Andy has tried
    > several with little success, so I think it's a matter of how much time
    > he's willing to spend on fixing this laptop for a friend. Of course the
    > external "sound card" will require speakers, thus making the whole thing
    > less portable.
    >
    > I think it's likely to be either a driver/setup problem, or a faulty
    > (or, more likely, just disconnected) socket. (Though that'd normally
    > just affect one channel - initially, though could get to both in time.)
    > I don't think he's said categorically that there isn't a continuous
    > faint hiss when headphones are used; that would be interesting to know.
    >
    > It'd also be useful - I _think_ - to know whether the MoDem "works", i.
    > e. whether if you plug it into a 'phoneline and tell it to dial, you
    > hear anything on a 'phone on the same line - or hear the relay doing
    > clunka-clunka-clunka if you tell it to pulse dial. However, I'm not sure
    > what it would tell us if it does work - probably at least that the
    > Southbridge onward communication is OK (but I don't know what else is on
    > there - probably other parts of the PC wouldn't be working if it
    > wasn't), and if it doesn't it could just be part of the same driver
    > setup problem.
    >>
    >> We already have a precedent, in the form of the ICH5 failures though,
    >> where the bond wires burning on the power to the I/O pins
    >> (the USB failure problem), and all the USB I/O dies at the
    >> same time. But in that case, we have a good number of chips
    >> with a big burn mark in the center of them. If this was a
    >> design flaw in the OPs hardware, then we'd expect to find audio
    >> chips dropping like flies. Just like, I've read maybe

    >
    > Well, not if some previous owner/user has shorted the outputs ...
    > []
    >> (Static electricity can do this... eventually. The burn mark
    >> is over top of the bond wires that power USB I/O pads. All
    >> your USB I/O dies at the connector, but Device Manager looks
    >> perfect!)

    >
    > And a dud audio output stage would still make the "sound card" appear OK
    > in DM. But I agree this is less likely - though certainly possible! -
    > than a driver/setup problem, or a socket solder break.


    I just had a thought.

    I wonder if the modem is on a removable assembly ?
    Such that, you could pull it, then retest the audoo ?

    Or alternately, I wonder if the BIOS has a "disable" for the
    modem. Now, being a pre-built machine, I suppose the BIOS would
    be dumbed down. I mean, my laptop has a grand total of *one*
    setting in it, changing the hard drive bay from IDE to AHCI.
    You can't get much dumber than that, for a BIOS. My desktops
    have a metric ton of settings by comparison (home built machines).
    I can disable my HDAudio on this machine, if I want to.

    A third possibility, is going into Device Manager, and setting
    the modem HDAudio device to "Disable". But based on this
    mess not working in the first place, I somehow doubt
    that'll do anything. It would be "for the sake of
    completeness" kind of test.

    Some of my earlier motherboards (AC97), the output impedance is
    quoted as a relatively high number. With the HDAudio generation,
    that changed. The output impedance is listed as 1 ohm, so "quite
    brittle". Now, being CMOS, we know it can't possibly do that
    in a large signal situation (trying to drive ~1V RMS). The HDAudio
    CODEC is not a "power amp". (It doesn't have a heatsink on it.)
    They must rely on some other limitations in the path, for the
    corner cases.

    Paul

  9. #29
    Ext User(Bob H) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On 18/08/2013 13:06, Paul wrote:>
    > I just had a thought.
    >
    > I wonder if the modem is on a removable assembly ?
    > Such that, you could pull it, then retest the audoo ?
    >
    > Or alternately, I wonder if the BIOS has a "disable" for the
    > modem. Now, being a pre-built machine, I suppose the BIOS would
    > be dumbed down. I mean, my laptop has a grand total of *one*
    > setting in it, changing the hard drive bay from IDE to AHCI.
    > You can't get much dumber than that, for a BIOS. My desktops
    > have a metric ton of settings by comparison (home built machines).
    > I can disable my HDAudio on this machine, if I want to.
    >
    > A third possibility, is going into Device Manager, and setting
    > the modem HDAudio device to "Disable". But based on this
    > mess not working in the first place, I somehow doubt
    > that'll do anything. It would be "for the sake of
    > completeness" kind of test.
    >
    > Some of my earlier motherboards (AC97), the output impedance is
    > quoted as a relatively high number. With the HDAudio generation,
    > that changed. The output impedance is listed as 1 ohm, so "quite
    > brittle". Now, being CMOS, we know it can't possibly do that
    > in a large signal situation (trying to drive ~1V RMS). The HDAudio
    > CODEC is not a "power amp". (It doesn't have a heatsink on it.)
    > They must rely on some other limitations in the path, for the
    > corner cases.
    >
    > Paul


    I booted into the BIOS of the laptop and it was dumbed down with very
    little options on what can be changed. Of course the modem was not even
    listed!

    I then booted into windows XP and disabled the modem, rebooted again and
    tried for sound....no there wasn't. So disabling the modem didn't make
    any difference

    I don't really want to take it apart as I am not really sure what I will
    be looking for when it is disassembled.

    The machine in question is a sony viao vgn-fs285b

    Thanks

  10. #30
    Ext User(Paul) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    Bob H wrote:
    > On 18/08/2013 13:06, Paul wrote:>
    > > I just had a thought.
    > >
    > > I wonder if the modem is on a removable assembly ?
    > > Such that, you could pull it, then retest the audoo ?
    > >
    > > Or alternately, I wonder if the BIOS has a "disable" for the
    > > modem. Now, being a pre-built machine, I suppose the BIOS would
    > > be dumbed down. I mean, my laptop has a grand total of *one*
    > > setting in it, changing the hard drive bay from IDE to AHCI.
    > > You can't get much dumber than that, for a BIOS. My desktops
    > > have a metric ton of settings by comparison (home built machines).
    > > I can disable my HDAudio on this machine, if I want to.
    > >
    > > A third possibility, is going into Device Manager, and setting
    > > the modem HDAudio device to "Disable". But based on this
    > > mess not working in the first place, I somehow doubt
    > > that'll do anything. It would be "for the sake of
    > > completeness" kind of test.
    > >
    > > Some of my earlier motherboards (AC97), the output impedance is
    > > quoted as a relatively high number. With the HDAudio generation,
    > > that changed. The output impedance is listed as 1 ohm, so "quite
    > > brittle". Now, being CMOS, we know it can't possibly do that
    > > in a large signal situation (trying to drive ~1V RMS). The HDAudio
    > > CODEC is not a "power amp". (It doesn't have a heatsink on it.)
    > > They must rely on some other limitations in the path, for the
    > > corner cases.
    > >
    > > Paul

    >
    > I booted into the BIOS of the laptop and it was dumbed down with very
    > little options on what can be changed. Of course the modem was not even
    > listed!
    >
    > I then booted into windows XP and disabled the modem, rebooted again and
    > tried for sound....no there wasn't. So disabling the modem didn't make
    > any difference
    >
    > I don't really want to take it apart as I am not really sure what I will
    > be looking for when it is disassembled.
    >
    > The machine in question is a sony viao vgn-fs285b
    >
    > Thanks


    There's one on Ebay :-) Sub-assembly claims to be a modem :-)
    There is only one I/O cable visible.

    P/N : RD02-D110
    http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Sony-VGN-FS-S...-/120710668823

    So that shows what Sony used on another laptop.

    The "business end" of the cable, may be a compression fit
    under an elastomer connector.

    I don't think I've seen one like that before. It's pretty small,
    and it's unclear how the signals get to the RJ-11. You'd think
    the RJ-11 would be part of the tiny circuit board.

    Paul

  11. #31
    Ext User(Bob H) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On 18/08/2013 13:55, Paul wrote:
    > Bob H wrote:
    >> On 18/08/2013 13:06, Paul wrote:>
    >> > I just had a thought.
    >> >
    >> > I wonder if the modem is on a removable assembly ?
    >> > Such that, you could pull it, then retest the audoo ?
    >> >
    >> > Or alternately, I wonder if the BIOS has a "disable" for the
    >> > modem. Now, being a pre-built machine, I suppose the BIOS would
    >> > be dumbed down. I mean, my laptop has a grand total of *one*
    >> > setting in it, changing the hard drive bay from IDE to AHCI.
    >> > You can't get much dumber than that, for a BIOS. My desktops
    >> > have a metric ton of settings by comparison (home built machines).
    >> > I can disable my HDAudio on this machine, if I want to.
    >> >
    >> > A third possibility, is going into Device Manager, and setting
    >> > the modem HDAudio device to "Disable". But based on this
    >> > mess not working in the first place, I somehow doubt
    >> > that'll do anything. It would be "for the sake of
    >> > completeness" kind of test.
    >> >
    >> > Some of my earlier motherboards (AC97), the output impedance is
    >> > quoted as a relatively high number. With the HDAudio generation,
    >> > that changed. The output impedance is listed as 1 ohm, so "quite
    >> > brittle". Now, being CMOS, we know it can't possibly do that
    >> > in a large signal situation (trying to drive ~1V RMS). The HDAudio
    >> > CODEC is not a "power amp". (It doesn't have a heatsink on it.)
    >> > They must rely on some other limitations in the path, for the
    >> > corner cases.
    >> >
    >> > Paul

    >>
    >> I booted into the BIOS of the laptop and it was dumbed down with very
    >> little options on what can be changed. Of course the modem was not
    >> even listed!
    >>
    >> I then booted into windows XP and disabled the modem, rebooted again
    >> and tried for sound....no there wasn't. So disabling the modem didn't
    >> make any difference
    >>
    >> I don't really want to take it apart as I am not really sure what I
    >> will be looking for when it is disassembled.
    >>
    >> The machine in question is a sony viao vgn-fs285b
    >>
    >> Thanks

    >
    > There's one on Ebay :-) Sub-assembly claims to be a modem :-)
    > There is only one I/O cable visible.
    >
    > P/N : RD02-D110
    > http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Sony-VGN-FS-S...-/120710668823
    >
    >
    > So that shows what Sony used on another laptop.
    >
    > The "business end" of the cable, may be a compression fit
    > under an elastomer connector.
    >
    > I don't think I've seen one like that before. It's pretty small,
    > and it's unclear how the signals get to the RJ-11. You'd think
    > the RJ-11 would be part of the tiny circuit board.
    >
    > Paul


    The thing is, am I wanting a modem board or a soundcard board for this
    laptop. If it comes to it then I think I'd rather go for a soundcard
    board or whatever it may be.

  12. #32
    Ext User(J. P. Gilliver (John)) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    In message <kuqg7j$7s4$1@dont-email.me>, Paul <nospam@needed.com>
    writes:
    >Bob H wrote:

    []
    >> I booted into the BIOS of the laptop and it was dumbed down with
    >>very little options on what can be changed. Of course the modem was
    >>not even listed!
    >> I then booted into windows XP and disabled the modem, rebooted again
    >>and tried for sound....no there wasn't. So disabling the modem didn't
    >>make any difference


    Would be interesting - though more a "for completeness" than anything
    else, I fear - to know if the MoDem actually works (at least makes
    dialling sounds). [Obviously, after being re-enabled!]

    >> I don't really want to take it apart as I am not really sure what I
    >>will be looking for when it is disassembled.


    Well, I'd say hairline cracks in the solder on the speaker/headphone
    socket would be a good candidate, if it's hardware at all. (Is there any
    hiss - or even a click at startup/shutdown - from the internal speakers?
    Probably difficult to tell with all the other noises [fans etc.] in the
    box.)

    >> The machine in question is a sony viao vgn-fs285b


    Hmm. Looking at http://ebay.eu/1bJd55P, it looks like the green and pink
    sockets are actually mounted directly on the motherboard.

    >> Thanks

    >
    >There's one on Ebay :-) Sub-assembly claims to be a modem :-)
    >There is only one I/O cable visible.
    >
    >P/N : RD02-D110
    >http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Sony-VGN-FS-S...M85-04-LF-1417
    >53912-/120710668823
    >
    >So that shows what Sony used on another laptop.
    >
    >The "business end" of the cable, may be a compression fit
    >under an elastomer connector.


    One of those tongue-like things (common for laptop keyboards)?
    >
    >I don't think I've seen one like that before. It's pretty small,
    >and it's unclear how the signals get to the RJ-11. You'd think
    >the RJ-11 would be part of the tiny circuit board.


    Yes, you'd have thought so! If you look at the link I give above (click
    on the picture, then again to zoom in), I _think_ the RJ11 is on the
    mobo (at the back of the picture), but it's hard to see clearly.
    >
    > Paul

    --
    J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

    War is God's way of teaching Americans geography. -Ambrose Bierce, writer
    (1842-1914)

  13. #33
    Ext User(Bob H) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On 18/08/2013 14:28, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    > In message <kuqg7j$7s4$1@dont-email.me>, Paul <nospam@needed.com> writes:
    >> Bob H wrote:

    > []
    >>> I booted into the BIOS of the laptop and it was dumbed down with
    >>> very little options on what can be changed. Of course the modem was
    >>> not even listed!
    >>> I then booted into windows XP and disabled the modem, rebooted again
    >>> and tried for sound....no there wasn't. So disabling the modem
    >>> didn't make any difference

    >
    > Would be interesting - though more a "for completeness" than anything
    > else, I fear - to know if the MoDem actually works (at least makes
    > dialling sounds). [Obviously, after being re-enabled!]
    >
    >>> I don't really want to take it apart as I am not really sure what I
    >>> will be looking for when it is disassembled.

    >
    > Well, I'd say hairline cracks in the solder on the speaker/headphone
    > socket would be a good candidate, if it's hardware at all. (Is there any
    > hiss - or even a click at startup/shutdown - from the internal speakers?
    > Probably difficult to tell with all the other noises [fans etc.] in the
    > box.)
    >
    >>> The machine in question is a sony viao vgn-fs285b

    >
    > Hmm. Looking at http://ebay.eu/1bJd55P, it looks like the green and pink
    > sockets are actually mounted directly on the motherboard.
    >
    >>> Thanks

    >>
    >> There's one on Ebay :-) Sub-assembly claims to be a modem :-)
    >> There is only one I/O cable visible.
    >>
    >> P/N : RD02-D110
    >> http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Sony-VGN-FS-S...M85-04-LF-1417
    >> 53912-/120710668823
    >>
    >> So that shows what Sony used on another laptop.
    >>
    >> The "business end" of the cable, may be a compression fit
    >> under an elastomer connector.

    >
    > One of those tongue-like things (common for laptop keyboards)?
    >>
    >> I don't think I've seen one like that before. It's pretty small,
    >> and it's unclear how the signals get to the RJ-11. You'd think
    >> the RJ-11 would be part of the tiny circuit board.

    >
    > Yes, you'd have thought so! If you look at the link I give above (click
    > on the picture, then again to zoom in), I _think_ the RJ11 is on the
    > mobo (at the back of the picture), but it's hard to see clearly.
    >>
    >> Paul


    I connected a RJ11 telephone cable to the laptop and have just tried
    dialing a fax no. with or by telnet, if that is right, as its years
    since I did that sort of thing.
    Anyway, telnet said it was dialing, although I could not hear anything
    as I would normally expect to, then after a few seconds it stopped
    saying no dialtone, so I don't know if it was actually diialing or not.

  14. #34
    Ext User(J. P. Gilliver (John)) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    In message <iKqdnc_KCsaQbY3PnZ2dnUVZ8kmdnZ2d@giganews.com>, Bob H
    <bob@despammer.com> writes:
    []
    >I connected a RJ11 telephone cable to the laptop and have just tried
    >dialing a fax no. with or by telnet, if that is right, as its years
    >since I did that sort of thing.


    (Yes, I'd have to scratch my head too. I'd probably try to HyperTerminal
    into the pseudo-COM port that the MoDem presents, and then send it "ATP
    8" or "ATT <number>" [for pulse or tone dialling]; however, I don't know
    if all internal MoDems in laptops, especially WinModems, actually appear
    as a COM port. Nor how to find which one - though what HyperTerminal
    offered for one to choose from would probably give some idea, COM1
    probably being a real COM port, as you said the laptop had a 9 pin male
    connector.)

    >Anyway, telnet said it was dialing, although I could not hear anything
    >as I would normally expect to, then after a few seconds it stopped


    Were you listening to the laptop('s speakers), or on another actual
    'phone connected to the same line?

    >saying no dialtone, so I don't know if it was actually diialing or not.


    (I presume the other end of the cable _was_ connected to a 'phone line
    on which there _was_ a dial tone!)

    Usually they don't start making the dialling tones (or clunking the
    relay) until they've detected a dial tone.
    --
    J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

    There's nothing wrong with looking at cake. - Sarah Millican, Radio Times
    10-16 December 2011

  15. #35
    Ext User(Bob H) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On 18/08/2013 17:34, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    > In message <iKqdnc_KCsaQbY3PnZ2dnUVZ8kmdnZ2d@giganews.com>, Bob H
    > <bob@despammer.com> writes:
    > []
    >> I connected a RJ11 telephone cable to the laptop and have just tried
    >> dialing a fax no. with or by telnet, if that is right, as its years
    >> since I did that sort of thing.

    >
    > (Yes, I'd have to scratch my head too. I'd probably try to HyperTerminal
    > into the pseudo-COM port that the MoDem presents, and then send it "ATP
    > 8" or "ATT <number>" [for pulse or tone dialling]; however, I don't know
    > if all internal MoDems in laptops, especially WinModems, actually appear
    > as a COM port. Nor how to find which one - though what HyperTerminal
    > offered for one to choose from would probably give some idea, COM1
    > probably being a real COM port, as you said the laptop had a 9 pin male
    > connector.)
    >
    >> Anyway, telnet said it was dialing, although I could not hear anything
    >> as I would normally expect to, then after a few seconds it stopped

    >
    > Were you listening to the laptop('s speakers), or on another actual
    > 'phone connected to the same line?
    >
    >> saying no dialtone, so I don't know if it was actually diialing or not.

    >
    > (I presume the other end of the cable _was_ connected to a 'phone line
    > on which there _was_ a dial tone!)
    >
    > Usually they don't start making the dialling tones (or clunking the
    > relay) until they've detected a dial tone.


    It was Hyperterminal I used, as I had to look!

    I don't recall saying it had a 9 pin male connector???
    I've just had another look round the laptop, and the only pin connector
    is a female monitor connector.

    You've lost me now when you said send it to ATP 8 or ATT numbers. I have
    no idea how to do that I'm afraid. I might have done 15/20 years ago,
    but not now, lol.

    Yes I was listening on the laptops speakers and also on another phone
    connected to the same line, and although there was obviously a dialtone
    with the phone there was nothing when I dialed out.


  16. #36
    Ext User(J. P. Gilliver (John)) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    In message <w8CdnZ41AceMYI3PnZ2dnUVZ8sadnZ2d@giganews.com>, Bob H
    <bob@despammer.com> writes:
    []
    >It was Hyperterminal I used, as I had to look!
    >
    >I don't recall saying it had a 9 pin male connector???
    >I've just had another look round the laptop, and the only pin connector
    >is a female monitor connector.


    Ah, I'm confusing two threads! There's another one about using an
    external monitor. I think I've got them mixed up in my head.
    >
    >You've lost me now when you said send it to ATP 8 or ATT numbers. I
    >have no idea how to do that I'm afraid. I might have done 15/20 years
    >ago, but not now, lol.


    I too haven't done it for a long time!

    HyperTerminal defaults to looking after the MoDem part for you. However,
    if you tell it - hang on, let me fire it up (not sure it ever has been
    on this netbook; I think not as it asked me if I wanted it to be the
    default telnet prog.!), and you click Cancel on the Connection
    Description box that appears, you then get a dumb serial terminal. At
    least I _think_ that's the case: it's not working that way for me here,
    but this netbook has neither a serial port nor an internal MoDem that
    might appear as one. Anyway, _somehow_ you get to a point where you
    select which COM port, what baud rate, handshake, and parity, and so on.
    (This is not the parameters for the MoDem to use to talk to the remote
    computer: they're what you're using to talk to the MoDem. Think of it as
    if it was a real external box; many internal MoDems - including a lot of
    WinModems, via their driver - "look" like an external box connected via
    a phantom COM port.)

    If you then send a blank line to the MoDem (by pressing enter), it
    responds with something like

    COMMAND: (I can't remember if that's the word, but something similar.)

    to which you give it an AT command, something like

    ATP 8

    which would tell it to wait for a dial tone, then pulse-dial an 8. (ATT
    8 would do the same with tone dialling.) If it succeeds, and connects to
    another MoDem at a remote location (obviously you'd have given it a more
    than one digit number to dial!), the remote MoDem would make some noise,
    then the two MoDems would negotiate a speed, then it would say something
    like

    CONNECTED 2400

    after which it would go into a transparent mode, such that anything you
    type after that isn't a command to your own MoDem, but is sent to the
    remote one. If for some reason it fails, it would stay in local mode,
    and say something like

    NO DIAL TONE

    .. Another command you can try is

    ATI

    (the I stands for information), which will prompt it to tell you
    something about itself - model number or similar. You can try

    ATI 0

    and other digits; they should elicit other information from it. What
    number you can go up to depends on the MoDem.

    Note this is all done from very old memory, and may be incorrect in
    assorted ways! There is also the possibility that the MoDem
    _isn't_configured to (a) appear as if behind a serial port (b) accept
    "AT" commands (I think that means "Hayes-compatible"), but they're
    things I'd try.

    This is really only incidental to the question of whether the sound
    "card" on the same "bus" (bridge?) is alive, though!
    >
    >Yes I was listening on the laptops speakers and also on another phone
    >connected to the same line, and although there was obviously a dialtone
    >with the phone there was nothing when I dialed out.
    >

    Maybe Paul or someone else reading this can deduce something from that!
    --
    J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

    "Purgamentum init, exit purgamentum." Translation: "Garbage in, garbage out."

  17. #37
    Ext User(Bob H) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On 18/08/2013 18:22, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    > In message <w8CdnZ41AceMYI3PnZ2dnUVZ8sadnZ2d@giganews.com>, Bob H
    > <bob@despammer.com> writes:
    > []
    >> It was Hyperterminal I used, as I had to look!
    >>
    >> I don't recall saying it had a 9 pin male connector???
    >> I've just had another look round the laptop, and the only pin
    >> connector is a female monitor connector.

    >
    > Ah, I'm confusing two threads! There's another one about using an
    > external monitor. I think I've got them mixed up in my head.
    >>
    >> You've lost me now when you said send it to ATP 8 or ATT numbers. I
    >> have no idea how to do that I'm afraid. I might have done 15/20 years
    >> ago, but not now, lol.

    >
    > I too haven't done it for a long time!
    >
    > HyperTerminal defaults to looking after the MoDem part for you. However,
    > if you tell it - hang on, let me fire it up (not sure it ever has been
    > on this netbook; I think not as it asked me if I wanted it to be the
    > default telnet prog.!), and you click Cancel on the Connection
    > Description box that appears, you then get a dumb serial terminal. At
    > least I _think_ that's the case: it's not working that way for me here,
    > but this netbook has neither a serial port nor an internal MoDem that
    > might appear as one. Anyway, _somehow_ you get to a point where you
    > select which COM port, what baud rate, handshake, and parity, and so on.
    > (This is not the parameters for the MoDem to use to talk to the remote
    > computer: they're what you're using to talk to the MoDem. Think of it as
    > if it was a real external box; many internal MoDems - including a lot of
    > WinModems, via their driver - "look" like an external box connected via
    > a phantom COM port.)
    >
    > If you then send a blank line to the MoDem (by pressing enter), it
    > responds with something like
    >
    > COMMAND: (I can't remember if that's the word, but something similar.)
    >
    > to which you give it an AT command, something like
    >
    > ATP 8
    >
    > which would tell it to wait for a dial tone, then pulse-dial an 8. (ATT
    > 8 would do the same with tone dialling.) If it succeeds, and connects to
    > another MoDem at a remote location (obviously you'd have given it a more
    > than one digit number to dial!), the remote MoDem would make some noise,
    > then the two MoDems would negotiate a speed, then it would say something
    > like
    >
    > CONNECTED 2400
    >
    > after which it would go into a transparent mode, such that anything you
    > type after that isn't a command to your own MoDem, but is sent to the
    > remote one. If for some reason it fails, it would stay in local mode,
    > and say something like
    >
    > NO DIAL TONE
    >
    > . Another command you can try is
    >
    > ATI
    >
    > (the I stands for information), which will prompt it to tell you
    > something about itself - model number or similar. You can try
    >
    > ATI 0
    >
    > and other digits; they should elicit other information from it. What
    > number you can go up to depends on the MoDem.
    >
    > Note this is all done from very old memory, and may be incorrect in
    > assorted ways! There is also the possibility that the MoDem
    > _isn't_configured to (a) appear as if behind a serial port (b) accept
    > "AT" commands (I think that means "Hayes-compatible"), but they're
    > things I'd try.
    >
    > This is really only incidental to the question of whether the sound
    > "card" on the same "bus" (bridge?) is alive, though!
    >>
    >> Yes I was listening on the laptops speakers and also on another phone
    >> connected to the same line, and although there was obviously a
    >> dialtone with the phone there was nothing when I dialed out.
    >>

    > Maybe Paul or someone else reading this can deduce something from that!


    Ok, in Hyperterminal, when I select or click the connect icon on the top
    menu bar a box appears and on that box there is a dial button. There are
    3 other buttons as well. So I click cancel, and that leaves me with a
    blank screen or terminal window.

    When I type ATP 8 then Enter, it returns ERROR
    When I type ATI then Enter, it returns 56000 OK
    ATI 0 returns the same as above

    In the bottom menu, It says Connected 0:0:034 Auto Detect 115200 8-N-1


  18. #38
    Ext User(Paul) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    Bob H wrote:
    > On 18/08/2013 18:22, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    >> In message <w8CdnZ41AceMYI3PnZ2dnUVZ8sadnZ2d@giganews.com>, Bob H
    >> <bob@despammer.com> writes:
    >> []
    >>> It was Hyperterminal I used, as I had to look!
    >>>
    >>> I don't recall saying it had a 9 pin male connector???
    >>> I've just had another look round the laptop, and the only pin
    >>> connector is a female monitor connector.

    >>
    >> Ah, I'm confusing two threads! There's another one about using an
    >> external monitor. I think I've got them mixed up in my head.
    >>>
    >>> You've lost me now when you said send it to ATP 8 or ATT numbers. I
    >>> have no idea how to do that I'm afraid. I might have done 15/20 years
    >>> ago, but not now, lol.

    >>
    >> I too haven't done it for a long time!
    >>
    >> HyperTerminal defaults to looking after the MoDem part for you. However,
    >> if you tell it - hang on, let me fire it up (not sure it ever has been
    >> on this netbook; I think not as it asked me if I wanted it to be the
    >> default telnet prog.!), and you click Cancel on the Connection
    >> Description box that appears, you then get a dumb serial terminal. At
    >> least I _think_ that's the case: it's not working that way for me here,
    >> but this netbook has neither a serial port nor an internal MoDem that
    >> might appear as one. Anyway, _somehow_ you get to a point where you
    >> select which COM port, what baud rate, handshake, and parity, and so on.
    >> (This is not the parameters for the MoDem to use to talk to the remote
    >> computer: they're what you're using to talk to the MoDem. Think of it as
    >> if it was a real external box; many internal MoDems - including a lot of
    >> WinModems, via their driver - "look" like an external box connected via
    >> a phantom COM port.)
    >>
    >> If you then send a blank line to the MoDem (by pressing enter), it
    >> responds with something like
    >>
    >> COMMAND: (I can't remember if that's the word, but something similar.)
    >>
    >> to which you give it an AT command, something like
    >>
    >> ATP 8
    >>
    >> which would tell it to wait for a dial tone, then pulse-dial an 8. (ATT
    >> 8 would do the same with tone dialling.) If it succeeds, and connects to
    >> another MoDem at a remote location (obviously you'd have given it a more
    >> than one digit number to dial!), the remote MoDem would make some noise,
    >> then the two MoDems would negotiate a speed, then it would say something
    >> like
    >>
    >> CONNECTED 2400
    >>
    >> after which it would go into a transparent mode, such that anything you
    >> type after that isn't a command to your own MoDem, but is sent to the
    >> remote one. If for some reason it fails, it would stay in local mode,
    >> and say something like
    >>
    >> NO DIAL TONE
    >>
    >> . Another command you can try is
    >>
    >> ATI
    >>
    >> (the I stands for information), which will prompt it to tell you
    >> something about itself - model number or similar. You can try
    >>
    >> ATI 0
    >>
    >> and other digits; they should elicit other information from it. What
    >> number you can go up to depends on the MoDem.
    >>
    >> Note this is all done from very old memory, and may be incorrect in
    >> assorted ways! There is also the possibility that the MoDem
    >> _isn't_configured to (a) appear as if behind a serial port (b) accept
    >> "AT" commands (I think that means "Hayes-compatible"), but they're
    >> things I'd try.
    >>
    >> This is really only incidental to the question of whether the sound
    >> "card" on the same "bus" (bridge?) is alive, though!
    >>>
    >>> Yes I was listening on the laptops speakers and also on another phone
    >>> connected to the same line, and although there was obviously a
    >>> dialtone with the phone there was nothing when I dialed out.
    >>>

    >> Maybe Paul or someone else reading this can deduce something from that!

    >
    > Ok, in Hyperterminal, when I select or click the connect icon on the top
    > menu bar a box appears and on that box there is a dial button. There are
    > 3 other buttons as well. So I click cancel, and that leaves me with a
    > blank screen or terminal window.
    >
    > When I type ATP 8 then Enter, it returns ERROR
    > When I type ATI then Enter, it returns 56000 OK
    > ATI 0 returns the same as above
    >
    > In the bottom menu, It says Connected 0:0:034 Auto Detect 115200 8-N-1
    >


    It probably wouldn't have got that far along in the process,
    unless the modem driver was present and working to some extent.

    To me, it's hard to believe the analog ends of both I/O have died,
    while the Device Manager digital part of things is working. It
    just seems... wrong.

    Maybe the power source to run them has died, like a common three
    terminal regulator. On audio, the audio regulator doesn't usually
    power anything else. The audio power regulator is separate, to reduce
    noise in the audio output.

    If the HDAudio bus feeding the two chips was dead, they wouldn't
    have enumerated and showed up in Device Manager.

    Maybe I'd also test dial-out from Linux (if I could figure out how :-) ).

    Paul

  19. #39
    Ext User(J. P. Gilliver (John)) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    In message <kurenk$o7g$1@dont-email.me>, Paul <nospam@needed.com>
    writes:
    >Bob H wrote:

    []
    >> Ok, in Hyperterminal, when I select or click the connect icon on the
    >>top menu bar a box appears and on that box there is a dial button.
    >>There are 3 other buttons as well. So I click cancel, and that leaves
    >>me with a blank screen or terminal window.
    >> When I type ATP 8 then Enter, it returns ERROR


    I've just looked it up:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayes_c...es_command_set

    It should have been ATDP8 or ATDT8 (D for dial). (I think ATD8 would
    also work.) ATP is indeed not included in the set. My error.

    >> When I type ATI then Enter, it returns 56000 OK
    >> ATI 0 returns the same as above


    Try ATI0 to ATI9 (and possibly ATI10 and above).

    >> In the bottom menu, It says Connected 0:0:034 Auto Detect 115200
    >>8-N-1
    >>

    That's how long, and with what parameters, HyperTerminal has been
    connected to the MoDem; basically, it's how long since you started
    HyperTerminal.
    >
    >It probably wouldn't have got that far along in the process,
    >unless the modem driver was present and working to some extent.


    Agreed. For it to be conversing, and even getting as far as interpreting
    AT commands, the imitation COM port and MoDem driver must be working.
    >
    >To me, it's hard to believe the analog ends of both I/O have died,
    >while the Device Manager digital part of things is working. It
    >just seems... wrong.


    Agreed ...
    >
    >Maybe the power source to run them has died, like a common three
    >terminal regulator. On audio, the audio regulator doesn't usually
    >power anything else. The audio power regulator is separate, to reduce
    >noise in the audio output.


    .... though the practical result of that is the same (-:! It's just a
    different piece of hardware that's dud. If it's a three terminal
    regulator, I might even consider it replaceable - can verify that with
    just a multimeter - though would like to eliminate the software
    possibilities first.
    >
    >If the HDAudio bus feeding the two chips was dead, they wouldn't
    >have enumerated and showed up in Device Manager.
    >
    >Maybe I'd also test dial-out from Linux (if I could figure out how :-) ).
    >
    > Paul


    Bob's had some difficulty getting external CDs to boot. (Maybe a
    bootable USB stick?)
    --
    J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

    "To YOU I'm an atheist; to God, I'm the Loyal Opposition." - Woody Allen

  20. #40
    Ext User(Bob H) Guest

    Re: No sound with WinXP Location 65535

    On 19/08/2013 07:36, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
    > In message <kurenk$o7g$1@dont-email.me>, Paul <nospam@needed.com> writes:
    >> Bob H wrote:

    > []
    >>> Ok, in Hyperterminal, when I select or click the connect icon on the
    >>> top menu bar a box appears and on that box there is a dial button.
    >>> There are 3 other buttons as well. So I click cancel, and that
    >>> leaves me with a blank screen or terminal window.
    >>> When I type ATP 8 then Enter, it returns ERROR

    >
    > I've just looked it up:
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayes_c...es_command_set
    >
    > It should have been ATDP8 or ATDT8 (D for dial). (I think ATD8 would
    > also work.) ATP is indeed not included in the set. My error.
    >
    >>> When I type ATI then Enter, it returns 56000 OK
    >>> ATI 0 returns the same as above

    >
    > Try ATI0 to ATI9 (and possibly ATI10 and above).
    >
    >>> In the bottom menu, It says Connected 0:0:034 Auto Detect 115200 8-N-1
    >>>

    > That's how long, and with what parameters, HyperTerminal has been
    > connected to the MoDem; basically, it's how long since you started
    > HyperTerminal.
    >>
    >> It probably wouldn't have got that far along in the process,
    >> unless the modem driver was present and working to some extent.

    >
    > Agreed. For it to be conversing, and even getting as far as interpreting
    > AT commands, the imitation COM port and MoDem driver must be working.
    >>
    >> To me, it's hard to believe the analog ends of both I/O have died,
    >> while the Device Manager digital part of things is working. It
    >> just seems... wrong.

    >
    > Agreed ...
    >>
    >> Maybe the power source to run them has died, like a common three
    >> terminal regulator. On audio, the audio regulator doesn't usually
    >> power anything else. The audio power regulator is separate, to reduce
    >> noise in the audio output.

    >
    > ... though the practical result of that is the same (-:! It's just a
    > different piece of hardware that's dud. If it's a three terminal
    > regulator, I might even consider it replaceable - can verify that with
    > just a multimeter - though would like to eliminate the software
    > possibilities first.
    >>
    >> If the HDAudio bus feeding the two chips was dead, they wouldn't
    >> have enumerated and showed up in Device Manager.
    >>
    >> Maybe I'd also test dial-out from Linux (if I could figure out how :-) ).
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > Bob's had some difficulty getting external CDs to boot. (Maybe a
    > bootable USB stick?)


    Well, after trying 3 different USB tools to get a linux iso bootable on
    my 2gb usb stick, I finally managed to make a ubuntu bootable image.

    Just for information, win7 usb tool complained the iso was no a proper iso.
    ISO to USB tool complained the path was too long:
    E:\Downloads\Temp\Ubuntu.8.10.iso

    The tool which did the job was Unetbootin-windows.

    So after the bootable iso was created on the USB stick, I then plugged
    into the sony laptop, and restarted it to get into the BIOS.
    There was no option/no listing to select boot to USB, only HD, Floppy
    and Optical Drive.

    So after all that, I'm back to where I was.

    Thanks for the prompt anyway about using a USB stick.

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