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Thread: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

  1. #1
    Ext User(Dale) Guest

    What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    I'm an old man, who predates DOS and I've never put anything on purpose
    into a program files directory.

    Now that I've finally moved to windows 7, I see there is this crazy
    assemblage of EXTRA program files directories.

    Can someone explain the rationale to me?

    Thanks!


  2. #2
    Ext User(Bubba) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 3 Sep 2013, Dale <Dale@example.invalid> wrote:

    >I'm an old man, who predates DOS and I've never put anything on purpose
    >into a program files directory.
    >
    >Now that I've finally moved to windows 7, I see there is this crazy
    >assemblage of EXTRA program files directories.
    >
    >Can someone explain the rationale to me?
    >
    >Thanks!


    I always wondered the same thing. This seems to explain it:

    http://helpdeskgeek.com/windows-7/wi...files-folders/

    --
    Bub


  3. #3
    Ext User(Paul) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    Bubba wrote:
    > On Tue, 3 Sep 2013, Dale <Dale@example.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >> I'm an old man, who predates DOS and I've never put anything on purpose
    >> into a program files directory.
    >>
    >> Now that I've finally moved to windows 7, I see there is this crazy
    >> assemblage of EXTRA program files directories.
    >>
    >> Can someone explain the rationale to me?
    >>
    >> Thanks!

    >
    > I always wondered the same thing. This seems to explain it:
    >
    > http://helpdeskgeek.com/windows-7/wi...files-folders/
    >


    http://www.howtogeek.com/129178/why-...es-x86-folder/

    "If youre looking for the short and sweet answer,
    turn to SuperUser contributor David Schwartz:

    Short answer: To ensure legacy 32-bit applications continue to work
    the same way they used to without imposing ugly rules on 64-bit applications
    that would create a permanent mess.

    It is not necessary. Its just more convenient than other possible solutions
    such as requiring every application to create its own way to separate 32-bit
    DLLs and executables from 64-bit DLLs and executables.

    The main reason is to make 32-bit applications that dont even know
    64-bit systems exist "just work", even if 64-bit DLLs are installed
    in places the applications might look. A 32-bit application wont be
    able to load a 64-bit DLL, so a method was needed to ensure that a
    32-bit application (that might pre-date 64-bit systems and thus have
    no idea 64-bit files even exist) wouldnt find a 64-bit DLL, try to
    load it, fail, and then generate an error message.

    The simplest solution to this is consistently separate directories.
    Really the only alternative is to require every 64-bit application
    to "hide" its executable files somewhere a 32-bit application wouldnt
    look, such as a bin64 directory inside that application.

    But that would impose permanent ugliness on 64-bit systems
    just to support legacy applications."

    I think I can see now, why no Microsoft employee wants to
    explain this on a Microsoft.com site.

    Paul

  4. #4
    Ext User(Stan Brown) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 3 Sep 2013 04:58:53 +0200 (CEST), Bubba wrote:
    >
    > On Tue, 3 Sep 2013, Dale <Dale@example.invalid> wrote:
    >
    > >I'm an old man, who predates DOS and I've never put anything on purpose
    > >into a program files directory.
    > >
    > >Now that I've finally moved to windows 7, I see there is this crazy
    > >assemblage of EXTRA program files directories.
    > >
    > >Can someone explain the rationale to me?
    > >
    > >Thanks!

    >
    > I always wondered the same thing. This seems to explain it:
    >
    > http://helpdeskgeek.com/windows-7/wi...files-folders/


    Well, it "seems to" until you actually read it! All it does is take
    many paragraphs to say what we already know: 32-bit apps go into C:
    \Program Files (x86) "by default". There's no indication of why that
    needs to be. It's _not_ so that Windows knows to give such programs
    special treatment. If it weer, then 32-bit programs installed in C:
    \Program Files would fail, but they don't.

    And don't get me started on HKLM\Software\WOW6432Node in the System
    Registry.

    --
    Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
    http://OakRoadSystems.com
    Shikata ga nai...

  5. #5
    Ext User(VanguardLH) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    <this post spotted in alt.comp.freeware>

    Dale cross-posted to alt.comp.freeware, a newsgroup unrelated to the
    alt.windows7.general newsgroup, then tried to rudely yank the discussion
    away from the freeware newsgroup that *he* chose to cross-posted (but
    which was thwarted by using the original Newsgroups in my reply):

    > I'm an old man, who predates DOS and I've never put anything on purpose
    > into a program files directory.


    Yet every program you installed defaulted to that location, didn't it?
    You didn't bother to explain why you thought you had to buck the
    default, or why your choice of an alternate installation path was better
    than the default.

    > Now that I've finally moved to windows 7, I see there is this crazy
    > assemblage of EXTRA program files directories.


    This is not an issue with any freeware. No version of Windows is
    freeware.

    > Can someone explain the rationale to me?


    Both Google and Bing still work:

    http://www.google.com/search?q=windows%2064-bit%20"program%20files%20(x86)"%20purpose
    http://www.bing.com/search?q=windows%2064-bit%20purpose%20"program%20files%20(x86)"

  6. #6
    Ext User(Dustin Cook) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    VanguardLH <V@nguard.LH> wrote in
    news:l0505k$rn7$1@news.albasani.net:

    > <this post spotted in alt.comp.freeware>
    >
    > Dale cross-posted to alt.comp.freeware, a newsgroup
    > unrelated to the alt.windows7.general newsgroup, then tried
    > to rudely yank the discussion away from the freeware
    > newsgroup that *he* chose to cross-posted (but which was
    > thwarted by using the original Newsgroups in my reply):


    Then he's a ****.

    >> I'm an old man, who predates DOS and I've never put
    >> anything on purpose into a program files directory.

    >
    > Yet every program you installed defaulted to that location,
    > didn't it? You didn't bother to explain why you thought you
    > had to buck the default, or why your choice of an alternate
    > installation path was better than the default.
    >
    >> Now that I've finally moved to windows 7, I see there is
    >> this crazy assemblage of EXTRA program files directories.

    >
    > This is not an issue with any freeware. No version of
    > Windows is freeware.
    >
    >> Can someone explain the rationale to me?

    >
    > Both Google and Bing still work:
    >
    > http://www.google.com/search?q=windows%2064-bit%20"program%2
    > 0files%20(x86)"%20purpose
    > http://www.bing.com/search?q=windows%2064-bit%20purpose%20"p
    > rogram%20files%20(x86)"
    >


    He's no programmer. He'll never work it out.


    --
    Trust yourself. You know more than I do.

  7. #7
    Ext User(Dale) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 10:44:51 -0500, VanguardLH wrote:

    >> I'm an old man, who predates DOS and I've never put anything on purpose
    >> into a program files directory.

    >
    > Yet every program you installed defaulted to that location, didn't it?


    I've never once installad a program into c:\program files, in my entire
    life, and, as I said, I predate all Windows operating systems by a decade
    (having run JCL and coded in Fortran before Fortran 77 ever existed!).

    The ONLY programs that go into the idiotically organized program files
    directory are those programs that either (a) existed prior to me owning
    the computer, or (b) those programs that are so badly coded that they
    owners couldn't conceive (or care?) about decent coding habits.

    Mainly I find those horrid programs to be ones from the big outfits
    such as Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, and the like.


    PS: I'm FORCED by my free nntp news server to have a single followup;
    so please feel free to respond to whatever groups you feel appropriate
    (I have no choice).

  8. #8
    Ext User(Dale) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 10:44:51 -0500, VanguardLH wrote:

    > Dale cross-posted to alt.comp.freeware, a newsgroup unrelated to the
    > alt.windows7.general newsgroup, then tried to rudely yank the discussion
    > away from the freeware newsgroup that *he* chose to cross-posted (but
    > which was thwarted by using the original Newsgroups in my reply):


    I have no choice.
    My nntp posting host REQURES a single followup.

    If you know a way around that, I'm all ears as I PREFER
    to not even specify a followup.


  9. #9
    Ext User(Dale) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 04:58:53 +0200, Bubba wrote:

    > This seems to explain it:
    > http://helpdeskgeek.com/windows-7/wi...program-files-

    folders/

    Thanks. I put their summary below.
    I wonder why they didn't just call it "program files 32-bit", which
    is what it apparently is (which has nothing, per se, to do with X86).
    Dale

    "If you have the 64-bit version of Windows 7 Home Premium, Professional,
    or Ultimate edition, you may have noticed that there are two Program
    Files folders on your hard drive.

    One is simply labeled Program Files and the other is labeled Program
    Files (x86). The first folder is the default location for all of your 64-
    bit programs. It does not have an extra label at the end because as a 64-
    bit operating system, it is assumed that you will have only 64-bit
    applications installed on your computer.

    The second folder labeled Program Files (x86) is the default location for
    all of your 32-bit applications. In a sense, it is a folder designed for
    legacy software that is left over from the days of 32-bit operating
    systems. The x86 portion of the folder name refers to the x86 32-bit
    architecture upon which the first 32-bit processors were developed such
    as the 386, 486, and Pentium CPUs.

    To help make the transition easier, Microsoft has designated that all 32-
    bit application should, by default, be loaded into the Program Files
    (x86) folder rather than getting mixed in with true 64-bit applications
    in the regular Program Files folder.


  10. #10
    Ext User(Dale) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 20:56:18 +0000, Dustin Cook wrote:

    > Then he's a ****.


    Actually, I'm not so much a **** as someone following the rules
    of his free news server, which REQUIRES a single followup.

    What I *should* do is find another free news server!


  11. #11
    Ext User(Dale) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 06:47:14 -0400, Stan Brown wrote:

    > If it were, then 32-bit programs installed in C:
    > \Program Files would fail, but they don't.


    This confuses me. I understand your statement, which is
    that no matter WHERE I install 32-bit apps on a 64-bit
    Windows 7 system, they still work.

    So, the fact they work has NOTHING to do with where
    they are installed.

    So, I must ask (although I fear I won't understand
    the answer) ... if it's not the fact of where they're
    installed, then ...

    HOW DO 32-bit apps know NOT to load 64-bit DLLs anyway?


  12. #12
    Ext User(Dale) Guest

    Re: What is this program files x86 stuff anyway?

    On Tue, 03 Sep 2013 20:56:18 +0000, Dustin Cook wrote:

    > He's no programmer. He'll never work it out.


    I'm an accountant. Retired. Programmed way back in the 70's
    (Fortran & Cobol) and then gave it up for spreadsheets.

    I belatedly realized, from this discussion, that the name
    of the program files x86 directory is a misnomer. It's really
    just a directory of 32-bit applications, and, they could just
    as well have gone into program files or into c:\programs (which
    is where I put all my programs anyway).

    So, in my c:\programs directory, I have both 32-bit and 64-bit
    applications ... which seem to co-exist perfectly fine.

    Since they co-exist perfectly fine, I wonder *why* Microsoft
    bothered to cordon them off separately?


  13. #13
    Ext User() Guest

    Try Mozilla Thunderbird and BlueWorldHosting. 

    <PRE Style='White-Space: PRE !important; Font-Size: 18px !important;Font-Family: DejaVu Sans Mono, monospace !important;'>*
    Dale, try Mozilla Thunderbird and BlueWorldHosting.

    Censorship is the raison d'être of most Cost⋅Free servers; to wit:
    dropping "Content-Type: text/HTML" posts and imposing newsgroups on you.

    Low⋅Cost, Text⋅Only servers are the fastest and most reliable; to wit:

    BlueWorldHosting: Sign up <<A hRef="http://usenet.blueworldhosting.com" target=_blank>Here</A>>
    Glorb: Sign up <<A hRef="http://glorb.com/contact.php" target=_blank>Here</A>>, ask for "unfiltered access".

    When not overloaded, <some binary servers>[*] are good and, for $5,
    you get more than enough gigs, assuming you don't download binaries.
    [ *: "usNews.BlockNews.NET:119" and "News.US.Usenet-News.NET:119" ]

    To mix fonts, you need HTML. To indent code, you need a monospaced font.
    I like the <PRE> tag ( i.e. a monospaced font and unaltered whitespace )
    because, normally, a variable⋅width font, auto⋅wrapped, is the default.

    Google Groups, Thunderbird and Windows Live Mail DISPLAY HTML,
    but only Thunderbird lets you POST "Content-Type: Text/HTML".
    "Content-Type: multipart/alternative" is CRAP, by the way.

    When "Content-Type: Text/HTML" is in the header, it's HTML.
    The "HTML" tag is implied, not required.

  14. #14
    Ext User() Guest

    Re: Try Mozilla Thunderbird and BlueWorldHosting. 

    Jeff-Relf.Me <@.> wrote:

    > Censorship is the raison d'tre of most Cost?Free servers; to wit:
    > dropping "Content-Type: text/HTML" posts and imposing newsgroups on you.


    Usenet is a text medium. If you wish to post in HTML, see
    the www.

    Any nsp who censors you does the rest of us a service.

  15. #15
    Ext User(Gene E. Bloch) Guest

    Re: Try Mozilla Thunderbird and BlueWorldHosting. 

    On Tue, 10 Sep 2013 03:08:03 +0800, Mirror of TRVTH wrote:

    > Jeff-Relf.Me <@.> wrote:
    >
    >> Censorship is the raison d'tre of most Cost?Free servers; to wit:
    >> dropping "Content-Type: text/HTML" posts and imposing newsgroups on you.

    >
    > Usenet is a text medium. If you wish to post in HTML, see
    > the www.
    >
    > Any nsp who censors you does the rest of us a service.


    Check the history of posts by Jeff Relf in news.software.readers :-)

    --
    Gene E. Bloch (Stumbling Bloch)

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