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Thread: checking system for hardware virtualization

  1. #1
    Ext User(emekadavid) Guest

    checking system for hardware virtualization

    how does one check to see if hardware virtualization is disabled for his bios? I installed kvm virtualization files into my system (fedora) but when i"egrep '(vmx|svm)' /proc/cpuinfo"-ed, the command returned no output but the yum install returned installation complete.

  2. #2
    Ext User(Paul) Guest

    Re: checking system for hardware virtualization

    emekadavid wrote:
    > how does one check to see if hardware virtualization is disabled
    > for his bios? I installed kvm virtualization files into my system (fedora)
    > but when i "egrep '(vmx|svm)' /proc/cpuinfo"-ed, the command returned
    > no output but the yum install returned installation complete.


    I saved the whole of /proc/cpuinfo for my E8400...

    http://ark.intel.com/products/33910/...z-1333-MHz-FSB

    "Intel Virtualization Technology (VT-x) - Yes"

    and with the BIOS enabled or disabled, the flags values
    are reported the same. Both strings have "vmx smx".

    flags: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat
    pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc
    arch_perfmon pebs bts aperfmperf pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx smx est
    tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm sse4_1 xsave lahf_lm dtherm tpr_shadow vnmi
    flexpriority
    flags: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat
    pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc
    arch_perfmon pebs bts aperfmperf pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx smx est
    tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm sse4_1 xsave lahf_lm dtherm tpr_shadow vnmi
    flexpriority

    My processor doesn't do VT-d, which as far as I can remember
    is the presence of an IOmmu. My processor has VT-x though.

    Linux is tricky when it comes to the BIOS. When the hardware
    has a "trap door", then Linux has no choice but to listen to
    the BIOS setting. (A trap door protected register, only
    accepts one write operation, and is "closed" after that.)
    If the hardware does not have trap door protection
    (for security reasons), Linux just does whatever
    it feels like. Some other OSes, are less presumptuous.

    To give an example of that, try this. Go into the BIOS, and
    disable the SATA port to your data hard drive (the one that
    doesn't have the OS on it). Now, boot Linux, and Linux will
    ignore the BIOS "disable" on the SATA, and enable and operate
    the data hard drive anyway.

    Paul

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