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Thread: OT The death of the home stereo system

  1. #1
    Ext User(Metspitzer) Guest

    OT The death of the home stereo system

    (CNN) -- For many years, it was a rite of fall.

    You moved into your dorm room or new apartment. You started unpacking
    the car. And the first thing you set up in your new place was the
    stereo system: receiver, turntable or CD player, tape deck and
    speakers.

    The wires could get tangled, and sometimes you had to make shelving
    out of a stack of milk crates. But only when the music was playing on
    those handpicked CDs, mix tapes or (geezer alert!) vinyl records did
    you move in the rest of your stuff.

    Daniel Rubio wouldn't know.

    To the 23-year-old, new dorm rooms and new apartments have meant
    computers, iTunes, Pandora and miniature speakers.

    "All I had to bring was my laptop. That's pretty much what everyone
    had," says Rubio, who attended Emory University in Atlanta and now
    works for a local marketing and communications firm. "It was actually
    pretty good sound. It would get the job done."

    http://cloud.feedly.com/#subscriptio...%2Fedition.rss

    I don't have the know how to make this happen, but I could see a home
    stereo could be saved if you could program it with your computer.

    I have been reading for long time that in the future even car tires
    will have IP address. If stereos had the technology to be controlled
    by the computer they would still be useful.

    I can see moving into a dorm with the laptop first, but you are most
    likely going to have a wireless router. If the stereo could be
    connected to the laptop wirelessly and given a password then I could
    see where big stereo speakers would move in next.

    You really wouldn't even need a laptop. You could control the stereo
    with a cellphone. It would be nice, in a dorm environment, where the
    stereo would play play lists from more than one phone/laptop at a time
    in a round robin configuration.

    This could also work with bluetooth in the car.

  2. #2
    Ext User(Michael Black) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On Fri, 27 Sep 2013, Metspitzer wrote:

    > (CNN) -- For many years, it was a rite of fall.
    >
    > You moved into your dorm room or new apartment. You started unpacking
    > the car. And the first thing you set up in your new place was the
    > stereo system: receiver, turntable or CD player, tape deck and
    > speakers.
    >
    > The wires could get tangled, and sometimes you had to make shelving
    > out of a stack of milk crates. But only when the music was playing on
    > those handpicked CDs, mix tapes or (geezer alert!) vinyl records did
    > you move in the rest of your stuff.
    >
    > Daniel Rubio wouldn't know.
    >
    > To the 23-year-old, new dorm rooms and new apartments have meant
    > computers, iTunes, Pandora and miniature speakers.
    >

    My "computer speakers" are a pair of small bookshelf speakers, fed by a
    full blown stereo receiver I got at a garage sale for $7.00. The speakers
    were bought at some other sale for about the same amount. My bedside
    system is about the same, though smaller speakers.

    I get way more value for the money. And yes, MP3s mean not that great
    sound, but I'd never put it through the tiny tinny speakers that are in
    most 'docking stations".

    It's amazing, one can see small stereo systems tossed out when the
    students leave, likely replaced with something smaller that has smaller
    speakers and is magically labelled a 'docking station".

    Michael

  3. #3
    Ext User(Flasherly) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On Fri, 27 Sep 2013 19:47:56 -0400, Metspitzer <Kilowatt@charter.net>
    wrote:

    >I don't think it is "ALL" about status. Having a set of speakers you
    >can listen too when you are in a group takes a stereo. A laptop or
    >cellphone just doesn't have the power. Lots of out door activities
    >(or....gasp......housework) are nice with a large set of speakers. You
    >should be able to play the mp3s you have on your phone over a large
    >set speakers without having to relinquish your phone.


    Ah, see where you're coming from ...

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/27/tech/i...stereo-system/

    (about the point where Google's 'most popular' is more relevant to me
    than what the media touts for its esteem).

    I researched sound engineers before selecting these, based on a regard
    for even and faithful reproduction without coloration;- It's a little
    different from the obsequious Polk Audio "experience." (Similar dome
    tweeters to my Studio Reference Series Polks, the Alesis are more
    overall accurately engineered, and if paired for a quad array, they're
    complimentary.) Running a pro sound processor (Behringher rack
    stuff), and have them EQ-d for a wet signal (another Behringer mixer
    routing path) to duplicate Sony headphones, which characteristically
    are received for a "Sony Sound" entailing emphasized upper
    frequencies.

    http://www.zzounds.com/item--ALEM1MK2

    Fairly reasonable for a bill and some change (a discontinued sale,
    apparently, as I saw some priced for $600 at the time of purchase).
    Open fronts, though. (Recently pulled the wire mesh cage from a
    vacuum amplifier, cut it in half and mounted it to the front of the
    speakers for protection.)

    Of course, then there's the other half - the amp. Picked up an ART
    (East Coast engineering and make). Regular retail cost.

    CNN would at times manifestly like to talk shit. Any kid paying $50K
    for college tuition, these days, won't be long before figuring a
    difference and advantage to classier studio-grade gear when leaving
    dorm-room sound piping, to realize a commodiousness suited better
    stations and equipment for non-restrictive listening.

  4. #4
    Ext User(Jon Danniken) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On 09/28/2013 08:31 AM, Larc wrote:
    >
    >There's a definite connection between the death of good home stereo systems and the
    > death of golden ears. Much of the public just doesn't seem to demand audiophile
    > sound quality anymore. They are perfectly happy with obviously reduced fidelity and
    > increased distortion just so long as it's loud enough. At a time when there has been
    > greater clamor for always better quality visuals, audio has been allowed to reverse.
    >
    > Well, at least most of the music they listen to wouldn't profit any from better sound
    > reproduction.


    Most kids these days have suffered hearing damage as the result of being
    exposed to the thumper cars which seem to popular, so it's no surprise
    that they have no ability to discern the finer sounds of life.

    Jon


  5. #5
    Ext User(Flasherly) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On Sat, 28 Sep 2013 21:20:39 -0400, Hench <idonot@know.ca> wrote:

    >I really don't give two flying fricks about sound quality so count me in
    >on that docking station craze fan list


    I can play, from a musical instrument, or record my own music. No
    doubt your wife agrees, at 5.1 stereophonic standards, Walmart might
    be receptive to consider advertising, at $59, what other lithely
    resplendent wives of a veritable fountain might also worthily reflect
    by life's passionate ardor. Last woman who recently danced for me, of
    her own accord, quite taken by my stereo and library of music,
    unfortunately, couldn't quite make up her mind to dance while I, then,
    played, vacillating, it seemed to me, as whether to just as easily go
    off and slam the bedroom door. Then, again, I'm apt to play material
    from periods now distanced by hundreds of years -- something her cute,
    jiggling little fanny might have felt vaguely estranged from.

  6. #6
    Ext User(Flasherly) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On Sun, 29 Sep 2013 10:53:26 -0400, Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca>
    wrote:

    > The good thing is that if they want good sound, they can always
    >revert to headphones, which of course puts them back into portable mode.
    >It's just that if they want speakers, they won't do so well. Even a
    >boombox with auxiliary inputs have bigger speakers (relative speaking)
    >than many of these docking stations.


    The WEB can provide anything with research and an ability to build a
    multimedia computer. Everything I bought for a new audio system,
    including the computer I built for streaming a red laser modulated
    output audio carrier (S/PDIF) into a dedicated rack-mounted (pre-amp)
    pro sound processor came from online musician's supply houses. Over
    $500US, but well under $1000US, which is quite a good price
    considering it'll deliver demanding stereophile quality grade
    reproduction. Identifying and finding around a $150 sale on Alesis
    speakers retailing for $600, at the time, was the hardest part, but
    once added, they'll EQ-in well enough to reproduce the pro headphone
    experience.

  7. #7
    Ext User(Hench) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On 9/29/2013 1:14 AM, Flasherly wrote:
    > On Sat, 28 Sep 2013 21:20:39 -0400, Hench <idonot@know.ca> wrote:
    >
    >> I really don't give two flying fricks about sound quality so count me in
    >> on that docking station craze fan list

    >
    > I can play, from a musical instrument, or record my own music. No
    > doubt your wife agrees, at 5.1 stereophonic standards, Walmart might
    > be receptive to consider advertising, at $59, what other lithely
    > resplendent wives of a veritable fountain might also worthily reflect
    > by life's passionate ardor. Last woman who recently danced for me, of
    > her own accord, quite taken by my stereo and library of music,
    > unfortunately, couldn't quite make up her mind to dance while I, then,
    > played, vacillating, it seemed to me, as whether to just as easily go
    > off and slam the bedroom door. Then, again, I'm apt to play material
    > from periods now distanced by hundreds of years -- something her cute,
    > jiggling little fanny might have felt vaguely estranged from.
    >


    my wife was happy with the 10 watt tv speakers and is now upset over the
    addition of another remote that will never be used yet is kept nearby.....

  8. #8
    Ext User(Flasherly) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On Sun, 29 Sep 2013 21:26:15 -0400, Hench <idonot@know.ca> wrote:

    >
    >my wife was happy with the 10 watt tv speakers and is now upset over the
    >addition of another remote that will never be used yet is kept nearby.....


    Surprised those programmable LED models haven't dropped over the years
    off a $100 mark;- unless she's very logically inclined, mention of
    operating one of those should keep a lesser backup in good readiness.

  9. #9
    Ext User(Larc) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On Sun, 29 Sep 2013 10:53:26 -0400, Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> wrote:

    | And then computers came along, everyone wants sound, but doesnt' want the
    | space. So instead of a decent sound system, they add horrible plastic
    | speakers with just enough amplification to get some sound out of them.
    | They aren't there for sound, they are there to get some sound.

    Those tiny (and usually tinny) speakers don't interest me. The soundcard in my main
    desktop feeds into a Technics digital receiver that powers a pair of floor-standing
    speakers (old Wharfedales), a center channel speaker mounted in the back top of the
    desk kneehole and 2 surround speakers. That setup does a great job on audio
    including CDs, DVD movies and TV.

    Larc

  10. #10
    Ext User(Robin Bignall) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    On Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:01:50 -0400, Larc <larc@notmyaddress.com> wrote:

    >On Sun, 29 Sep 2013 10:53:26 -0400, Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> wrote:
    >
    >| And then computers came along, everyone wants sound, but doesnt' want the
    >| space. So instead of a decent sound system, they add horrible plastic
    >| speakers with just enough amplification to get some sound out of them.
    >| They aren't there for sound, they are there to get some sound.
    >
    >Those tiny (and usually tinny) speakers don't interest me. The soundcard in my main
    >desktop feeds into a Technics digital receiver that powers a pair of floor-standing
    >speakers (old Wharfedales), a center channel speaker mounted in the backtop of the
    >desk kneehole and 2 surround speakers. That setup does a great job on audio
    >including CDs, DVD movies and TV.
    >

    I've got a similar setup using Celestion Ditton 25 speakers with a Nad
    amplifier. This is stereo only but the sound is better then the modern
    surround-sound system I have in another room. Speakers date from 1969.
    --
    Robin Bignall
    Herts, England

  11. #11
    Ext User(Don Phillipson) Guest

    Re: OT The death of the home stereo system

    "Larc" <larc@notmyaddress.com> wrote in message
    news:2ctd4955d5ip96jn4b8al0oeumpsb1opql@4ax.com...

    > There's a definite connection between the death of good home stereo
    > systems and the
    > death of golden ears. Much of the public just doesn't seem to demand
    > audiophile
    > sound quality anymore. They are perfectly happy with obviously reduced
    > fidelity and
    > increased distortion just so long as it's loud enough. At a time when
    > there has been
    > greater clamor for always better quality visuals, audio has been allowed
    > to reverse.


    Market forces have a role as well (speaking as someone who used to run
    home-built woofers in cases 5 ft. high, weighing 75 lb. or more, and ribbon-
    diaphragm horn tweeters. Each cost in the 1960s about $100 cash (one
    week's salary in 1964) and uncounted hours to build the cabinets. We can
    now buy ready-made speakers of similar performance for less than $500
    i.e. half the price in PPP.

    > Well, at least most of the music they listen to wouldn't profit any from
    > better sound
    > reproduction.


    Yes: the hi-fi listening community was definitely focussed 1920-70 on
    classical
    music, extending at the edges to jazz, but practically excluding current pop
    music.
    But official as well as private tastes have changed. One local reference
    point is
    music for government -sponsored open-air ceremonies for Canada Day, July 1.
    In the 1970s this meant military bands and children's choirs. Nowadays it
    means
    the most popular Youtube act the sponsors can afford to hire (adjusted for
    multicultural
    or ethnic representation.)

    --
    Don Phillipson
    Carlsbad Springs
    (Ottawa, Canada)





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