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Thread: Anyone able to contribute ?

  1. #1
    Ext User(Jason James) Guest

    Anyone able to contribute ?



    To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    around ?


    Was going to say sledging is banned,..but, that would cut the heart out
    of this time-proven tradition here :-)

    Jason

  2. #2
    Ext User() Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 18:29:33 +1000, Jason James <h6tgf22l@outlook.com>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    >some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    >around ?
    >
    >
    >Was going to say sledging is banned,..but, that would cut the heart out
    >of this time-proven tradition here :-)
    >
    >Jason


    This is one that took a while to diagnose
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-RhhjHLSHg






    OzOne of the three twins

    I welcome you to Crackerbox Palace.

  3. #3
    Ext User(D Walford) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 03/10/2013 6:29 PM, Jason James wrote:
    >
    >
    > To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    > some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    > around ?
    >


    Had plenty of difficult to find faults in cars, one I remember was an
    erratic idle on my VK Commodore, did all the usual checks and tune ups
    but it only helped a little bit, turned out to be loose inlet manifold
    bolts, tightened them and the problem went away for a while but it took
    3 goes to get them to stay tight which at the time seemed rather odd.




    --
    Daryl

  4. #4
    Ext User(Xeno Lith) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 3/10/13 6:29 PM, Jason James wrote:
    >
    >
    > To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    > some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    > around ?
    >

    Ask Noddy about rust in tin cars. It's a topic that seems to have been
    "jerking him around" for his entire time in the trade! That should be
    good for an extended discussion! LOL
    >
    > Was going to say sledging is banned,..but, that would cut the heart out
    > of this time-proven tradition here :-)


    Sledging? Banned? How would Noddy operate then? He might have to resort
    to facts like "cars made of tin".... ROTFLMFAO
    >
    > Jason



    --

    Xeno

  5. #5
    Ext User(Jeßus) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 20:35:16 +1000, D Walford
    <dwalford@internod.on.net> wrote:

    >On 03/10/2013 6:29 PM, Jason James wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    >> some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    >> around ?
    >>

    >
    >Had plenty of difficult to find faults in cars, one I remember was an
    >erratic idle on my VK Commodore,


    Not often you find a member of Monty Python under your bonnet.

  6. #6
    Ext User(Xeno Lith) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 4/10/13 5:32 AM, Jeßus wrote:
    > On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 20:35:16 +1000, D Walford
    > <dwalford@internod.on.net> wrote:
    >
    >> On 03/10/2013 6:29 PM, Jason James wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    >>> some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    >>> around ?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Had plenty of difficult to find faults in cars, one I remember was an
    >> erratic idle on my VK Commodore,

    >
    > Not often you find a member of Monty Python under your bonnet.
    >

    Was "Idle" ever anything other than erratic??

    --

    Xeno

  7. #7
    Ext User(Diesel Damo) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On Thursday, October 3, 2013 6:29:33 PM UTC+10, Jason James wrote:

    > To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    >
    > some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    >
    > around ?


    I can speak for Toyota Camrys and RAV4s around late 90s with this one.

    People call it "stutter", "judder", "stalling", "missing" and "fuel starving", but basically it's when you accelerate and it is just like someone is flipping your fuel supply on and off really fast. Sometimes I'd go to start my Camry and it would be flooded. I was even told by Toyota that that's impossible.

    People on forums had replaced entire ignition systems and all sorts of other things until someone finally figured out it was the CRANK ANGLE SENSOR.

    I know computers have given us incredibly efficient cars and things but I'mstill so glad I don't have one in my vehicle to make stupid decisions based on faulty sensors.

  8. #8
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/13 6:39 AM, Diesel Damo wrote:

    > I know computers have given us incredibly efficient cars and things but I'm still so glad I don't have one in my
    > vehicle to make stupid decisions based on faulty sensors.


    Interesting comment.

    The subject has been bandied around here before, but personally I think
    cars are more unreliable today than they were 30 or more years ago.
    Certainly computer control has given us engines with power outputs and
    economy levels we could only dream about in the 1970's, but the trade
    off seems to be in creating a whole new level of fragility that can not
    only see a car made totally inoperable by a minor component failure but
    the average mechanic being unable to tell what's wrong with the thing
    until it's hooked up to a diagnostic machine for the fault to be identified.

    We're also seeing common problems with items like clutches in vehicles
    with 2 piece flywheels, clutchless manual transmission failures, and
    other faults which seem to exist for no reason other than the
    "technology" being rushed onto the market before it's been fully tested.

    An example of how fragile new vehicles can be was driven home to me
    recently when a fiend called to say that his fairly new Mazda BT50
    diesel ute had gone into limp home mode in the auto trans after he
    hooked up a trailer at the local BE Hire outlet. Apparently the trailer
    wiring had blown his brake light fuse as he was driving out, and for
    reasons known only to Mazda that locked his auto trans in third gear
    cost him a lost day (with expenses) while he got the problem sorted.

    I mean, don't get me wrong. I'm all in favour of the technology and
    enjoy the benefits of it like anyone else. But when we get to this
    degree of complexity caused by something as *basic* as a blown stop lamp
    fuse we *clearly* need to look at the way we do things.

    I have a 1969 V8 Falcon in my shed. It's a totally shithouse car to
    drive compared to even the most basic car built within the last decade.
    It gets woeful mileage, makes bugger all power for the size of it's
    engine and has nothing in the way of creature comforts and safety
    equipment other than an Am radio and a set of non inertia reel lap/sash
    seat belts.

    But, it starts and runs every time you turn the key, you can carry a
    complete replacement ignition system around in the glove box and you can
    change it on the side of the road in under 15 minutes with nothing more
    than a knife and fork. Personally I'd be *far* more comfortable in
    getting in that and driving it to Brisbane than taking the Wife's 2006
    Ford Territory which starts every third or fourth time you turn the key
    and powers up the dash electrics every second time it manages to fire.


    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

  9. #9
    Ext User(D Walford) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/2013 5:32 AM, Jeßus wrote:
    > On Thu, 03 Oct 2013 20:35:16 +1000, D Walford
    > <dwalford@internod.on.net> wrote:
    >
    >> On 03/10/2013 6:29 PM, Jason James wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> To being mucked around by an obscure fault in their car,..then after
    >>> some time [or any length of time]finally found out what was jerking them
    >>> around ?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Had plenty of difficult to find faults in cars, one I remember was an
    >> erratic idle on my VK Commodore,

    >
    > Not often you find a member of Monty Python under your bonnet.
    >

    It would explain why the car was a joke:-)

    --
    Daryl

  10. #10
    Ext User(D Walford) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/2013 8:55 AM, Noddy wrote:
    > On 04/10/13 6:39 AM, Diesel Damo wrote:
    >
    >> I know computers have given us incredibly efficient cars and things
    >> but I'm still so glad I don't have one in my
    > > vehicle to make stupid decisions based on faulty sensors.

    >
    > Interesting comment.
    >
    > The subject has been bandied around here before, but personally I think
    > cars are more unreliable today than they were 30 or more years ago.
    > Certainly computer control has given us engines with power outputs and
    > economy levels we could only dream about in the 1970's, but the trade
    > off seems to be in creating a whole new level of fragility that can not
    > only see a car made totally inoperable by a minor component failure but
    > the average mechanic being unable to tell what's wrong with the thing
    > until it's hooked up to a diagnostic machine for the fault to be
    > identified.
    >
    > We're also seeing common problems with items like clutches in vehicles
    > with 2 piece flywheels, clutchless manual transmission failures, and
    > other faults which seem to exist for no reason other than the
    > "technology" being rushed onto the market before it's been fully tested.
    >
    > An example of how fragile new vehicles can be was driven home to me
    > recently when a fiend called to say that his fairly new Mazda BT50
    > diesel ute had gone into limp home mode in the auto trans after he
    > hooked up a trailer at the local BE Hire outlet. Apparently the trailer
    > wiring had blown his brake light fuse as he was driving out, and for
    > reasons known only to Mazda that locked his auto trans in third gear
    > cost him a lost day (with expenses) while he got the problem sorted.
    >
    > I mean, don't get me wrong. I'm all in favour of the technology and
    > enjoy the benefits of it like anyone else. But when we get to this
    > degree of complexity caused by something as *basic* as a blown stop lamp
    > fuse we *clearly* need to look at the way we do things.
    >
    > I have a 1969 V8 Falcon in my shed. It's a totally shithouse car to
    > drive compared to even the most basic car built within the last decade.
    > It gets woeful mileage, makes bugger all power for the size of it's
    > engine and has nothing in the way of creature comforts and safety
    > equipment other than an Am radio and a set of non inertia reel lap/sash
    > seat belts.
    >
    > But, it starts and runs every time you turn the key, you can carry a
    > complete replacement ignition system around in the glove box and you can
    > change it on the side of the road in under 15 minutes with nothing more
    > than a knife and fork. Personally I'd be *far* more comfortable in
    > getting in that and driving it to Brisbane than taking the Wife's 2006
    > Ford Territory which starts every third or fourth time you turn the key
    > and powers up the dash electrics every second time it manages to fire.
    >
    >

    My experience has been very much the opposite but that could be partly
    because I bought the cars we have now were bought new and older cars
    were bought second hand and had done a few kms.
    Since 2001 everything we have owned was either new or very close to it
    and reliability has been exceptional whereas I had continuous problems
    with a few older cars, the Mazda van which was bought new was a disaster
    and the VK needed constant attention, the XD van was better but still
    needed plenty of attention to keep it running but it did do a lot of
    hard kms.
    The new XD's I had when working for Ford were very reliable but because
    cars only had a 12/20 warranty back then and they had to be sold with
    warranty we only had them for 16,000km so it wasn't unusual to have 3
    new cars a year.
    I also had a few HQ panel vans as work cars and IMO they weren't great,
    autos were lucky to last 100,000km and rarely did they go between
    services without needing some attention but they were always loaded and
    driven hard.


    --
    Daryl

  11. #11
    Ext User(lindsay) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 4/10/2013 2:13 PM, Noddy wrote:
    > On 04/10/13 9:41 AM, D Walford wrote:
    >
    >> My experience has been very much the opposite but that could be partly
    >> because I bought the cars we have now were bought new and older cars
    >> were bought second hand and had done a few kms.

    >
    > I still get to do a fair bit of work on people's cars these days even
    > though I'm in "retirement", and I can tell you there are a lot of "bugs"
    > out there with new'ish cars. Some of it the dealers and/or factory can't
    > even take care of.
    >
    > Either because they don't know how, or they simply aren't interested in
    > trying.


    That sounds amazingly like Jefferson Ford's Braeside service dept!! :)
    They just dont give a shit.

    BF xr6 cab chassis ute I had had a flat spot 1st thing in the morning.
    Because it didnt show up on their scanner thingy, "nope, there's no
    problem". ****ing useless ****s.

  12. #12
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/13 9:41 AM, D Walford wrote:

    > My experience has been very much the opposite but that could be partly
    > because I bought the cars we have now were bought new and older cars
    > were bought second hand and had done a few kms.


    I still get to do a fair bit of work on people's cars these days even
    though I'm in "retirement", and I can tell you there are a lot of "bugs"
    out there with new'ish cars. Some of it the dealers and/or factory can't
    even take care of.

    Either because they don't know how, or they simply aren't interested in
    trying.


    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

  13. #13
    Ext User(D Walford) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/2013 2:13 PM, Noddy wrote:
    > On 04/10/13 9:41 AM, D Walford wrote:
    >
    >> My experience has been very much the opposite but that could be partly
    >> because I bought the cars we have now were bought new and older cars
    >> were bought second hand and had done a few kms.

    >
    > I still get to do a fair bit of work on people's cars these days even
    > though I'm in "retirement", and I can tell you there are a lot of "bugs"
    > out there with new'ish cars. Some of it the dealers and/or factory can't
    > even take care of.
    >
    > Either because they don't know how, or they simply aren't interested in
    > trying.
    >
    >

    Dealer service quality does seem to very variable.
    When I say that new cars are more reliable I'm not saying that I ever
    had major issues with older cars or that new cars are perfect but in
    recent times I've spent less and less time maintaining my cars, these
    days all I do is check the fluid levels and tyre pressures occasionally
    and take them for a service when due and almost never anything in
    between but I was always fiddling with older cars keeping them tuned etc.
    Both of our current cars have had gearbox repairs under warranty but
    neither cost us anything and Subaru didn't even charge us for the loan
    car we had for 3 days so I don't think of those problems as
    "unreliable", I replaced the VK Commy gearbox 3 times because they were
    noisy and that was a much bigger pita.
    XD van was damn near indestructible, it needed a new head shortly after
    I bought it due to a faulty casting but I replaced with one from the
    wreckers which only got a clean before being fitted and it was still
    there 350,000km later, gearbox input shaft bearing failed at 300,000km
    but a change over box with 12mths warranty was $90.00 so no big deal.

    --
    Daryl

  14. #14
    Ext User() Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 14:13:26 +1000, Noddy <me@wardengineering.com.au>
    wrote:

    >On 04/10/13 9:41 AM, D Walford wrote:
    >
    >> My experience has been very much the opposite but that could be partly
    >> because I bought the cars we have now were bought new and older cars
    >> were bought second hand and had done a few kms.

    >
    >I still get to do a fair bit of work on people's cars these days even
    >though I'm in "retirement", and I can tell you there are a lot of "bugs"
    >out there with new'ish cars. Some of it the dealers and/or factory can't
    >even take care of.
    >
    >Either because they don't know how, or they simply aren't interested in
    >trying.
    >
    >
    >--


    Yeah I can see you fixing sqeaks and rattles.

    You'd not have a clue about anything else past the mid 80's




    OzOne of the three twins

    I welcome you to Crackerbox Palace.

  15. #15
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/13 2:19 PM, lindsay wrote:

    > BF xr6 cab chassis ute I had had a flat spot 1st thing in the morning.
    > Because it didnt show up on their scanner thingy, "nope, there's no
    > problem". ****ing useless ****s.


    Yep, either that, or "it's characteristic of the model" are the two
    biggest cop outs currently offered to service customers.


    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

  16. #16
    Ext User(Jason James) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    D Walford wrote:

    >>

    > Dealer service quality does seem to very variable.
    > When I say that new cars are more reliable I'm not saying that I ever
    > had major issues with older cars or that new cars are perfect but in
    > recent times I've spent less and less time maintaining my cars, these
    > days all I do is check the fluid levels and tyre pressures occasionally
    > and take them for a service when due and almost never anything in
    > between but I was always fiddling with older cars keeping them tuned etc.
    > Both of our current cars have had gearbox repairs under warranty but
    > neither cost us anything and Subaru didn't even charge us for the loan
    > car we had for 3 days so I don't think of those problems as
    > "unreliable", I replaced the VK Commy gearbox 3 times because they were
    > noisy and that was a much bigger pita.
    > XD van was damn near indestructible, it needed a new head shortly after
    > I bought it due to a faulty casting but I replaced with one from the
    > wreckers which only got a clean before being fitted and it was still
    > there 350,000km later, gearbox input shaft bearing failed at 300,000km
    > but a change over box with 12mths warranty was $90.00 so no big deal.


    We had leased Falcodores at work. Every time we had a Holden and a
    Falcon of similar age, I did a standard performance test. Most of the
    time, a hill-climb on the way to Orange was used to compare engine
    power. You basically nailed it at the base of the hill, and noted speed
    at the top. For a few years '95-'99 they were neck and neck whilst held
    in 3rd gear [auto].

    Jason


  17. #17
    Ext User(Jason James) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    Noddy wrote:
    > On 04/10/13 9:41 AM, D Walford wrote:
    >
    >> My experience has been very much the opposite but that could be partly
    >> because I bought the cars we have now were bought new and older cars
    >> were bought second hand and had done a few kms.

    >
    > I still get to do a fair bit of work on people's cars these days even
    > though I'm in "retirement", and I can tell you there are a lot of "bugs"
    > out there with new'ish cars. Some of it the dealers and/or factory can't
    > even take care of.
    >
    > Either because they don't know how, or they simply aren't interested in
    > trying.


    I remember a guy who had an E38, or E49 Charger which he bought new. The
    engine got quite noisy after a couple of 1000 ks. Oil-pressure was
    mega-low. Took it to the dealer, and they claimed he had inadvertently
    contaminated the engine oil with dirt.

    So the circus began. He was a mechanic and got told the dirt was
    basically sand,...he somehow found out it was casting sand. To this day
    I dont know how it all ended up,..but at the time he was *mega-pissed off*

    Forward 7 or so years, and I was stripping down CM 245 Hemi, and I had
    the engine-block up-side down.with the casting sand debacle still fresh
    in my mind, I did a close inspection,..and FMFlo, there in the corner of
    the casting was a clear-coating. I dug it out with a screwdriver and
    there it was >> SAND ! They had sprayed the internal surfaces of the
    block with a clear-lacquer to seal the sand in !!.

    Now I know some folks are accused of BShitting,..and this story is one
    that fits the criteria. But hey,..I can only report what I saw :-)

    The dealership didn't want a *bar* of his complaints,..guess he could
    have hung the tripple webers off a nice wreckers 265,..refitted it with
    Copper-bronze bearings and touched wood so to speak


    Jason


  18. #18
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/13 2:41 PM, D Walford wrote:

    > Dealer service quality does seem to very variable.


    It does indeed.

    > When I say that new cars are more reliable I'm not saying that I ever
    > had major issues with older cars or that new cars are perfect but in
    > recent times I've spent less and less time maintaining my cars, these
    > days all I do is check the fluid levels and tyre pressures occasionally
    > and take them for a service when due and almost never anything in
    > between but I was always fiddling with older cars keeping them tuned etc.


    I service ours here myself, and they vary. The Rodeo has had the arse
    kicked out of it over the last 5 years and the only fault it's ever had
    has been to lose the second speed on the fan resistor which I'm happy to
    live with. The Territory gets treated pretty sedately by the wife, and
    it does nothing but fall apart and be problematic.

    > Both of our current cars have had gearbox repairs under warranty but
    > neither cost us anything and Subaru didn't even charge us for the loan
    > car we had for 3 days so I don't think of those problems as
    > "unreliable",


    Well, it's a reliability issue of sorts.

    > I replaced the VK Commy gearbox 3 times because they were
    > noisy and that was a much bigger pita.
    > XD van was damn near indestructible, it needed a new head shortly after
    > I bought it due to a faulty casting but I replaced with one from the
    > wreckers which only got a clean before being fitted and it was still
    > there 350,000km later, gearbox input shaft bearing failed at 300,000km
    > but a change over box with 12mths warranty was $90.00 so no big deal.


    As I mentioned I had a ZL Fairlane for many years, and the only things
    it ever got as replacement parts, apart from regular service items, were
    a couple of exterior door handles.





    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

  19. #19
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 04/10/13 3:58 PM, Jason James wrote:

    > I remember a guy who had an E38, or E49 Charger which he bought new. The
    > engine got quite noisy after a couple of 1000 ks. Oil-pressure was
    > mega-low. Took it to the dealer, and they claimed he had inadvertently
    > contaminated the engine oil with dirt.


    Hmm.. I could understand that being feasible if he buried the thing at
    the beach... :)

    > So the circus began. He was a mechanic and got told the dirt was
    > basically sand,...he somehow found out it was casting sand. To this day
    > I dont know how it all ended up,..but at the time he was *mega-pissed off*


    No doubt.

    The unfortunate thing for most people in such situations is that even if
    they are right they're *still* a mouse fighting a Gorilla.

    > Forward 7 or so years, and I was stripping down CM 245 Hemi, and I had
    > the engine-block up-side down.with the casting sand debacle still fresh
    > in my mind, I did a close inspection,..and FMFlo, there in the corner of
    > the casting was a clear-coating. I dug it out with a screwdriver and
    > there it was >> SAND ! They had sprayed the internal surfaces of the
    > block with a clear-lacquer to seal the sand in !!.


    Sand is a very common problem in engine blocks and is to this day. You
    notice it a lot at rebuild time. Blocks that go into the hot tank almost
    always come out with lots of sand that gets dislodged by the heat and
    caustic soda solution, and sometimes it can be quite old.

    I've seen engine blocks from the 1920's that have obviously held the
    sand trapped until they went into the hot tank and it all came out, and
    in some cases it can be a disaster. On more than one occasion I've seen
    a block come out of the hot tank with a ****ing great hole in it that
    was being sealed by a big lump of sand for decades.

    > Now I know some folks are accused of BShitting,..and this story is one
    > that fits the criteria. But hey,..I can only report what I saw :-)


    I don't doubt it for a second :)

    > The dealership didn't want a *bar* of his complaints,..guess he could
    > have hung the tripple webers off a nice wreckers 265,..refitted it with
    > Copper-bronze bearings and touched wood so to speak


    He should have taken them to court.


    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

  20. #20
    Ext User() Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On Fri, 04 Oct 2013 15:58:11 +1000, Jason James <h6tgf22l@outlook.com>
    wrote:

    >Noddy wrote:
    >> On 04/10/13 9:41 AM, D Walford wrote:
    >>
    >>> My experience has been very much the opposite but that could be partly
    >>> because I bought the cars we have now were bought new and older cars
    >>> were bought second hand and had done a few kms.

    >>
    >> I still get to do a fair bit of work on people's cars these days even
    >> though I'm in "retirement", and I can tell you there are a lot of "bugs"
    >> out there with new'ish cars. Some of it the dealers and/or factory can't
    >> even take care of.
    >>
    >> Either because they don't know how, or they simply aren't interested in
    >> trying.

    >
    >I remember a guy who had an E38, or E49 Charger which he bought new. The
    >engine got quite noisy after a couple of 1000 ks. Oil-pressure was
    >mega-low. Took it to the dealer, and they claimed he had inadvertently
    >contaminated the engine oil with dirt.
    >
    >So the circus began. He was a mechanic and got told the dirt was
    >basically sand,...he somehow found out it was casting sand. To this day
    >I dont know how it all ended up,..but at the time he was *mega-pissed off*
    >
    >Forward 7 or so years, and I was stripping down CM 245 Hemi, and I had
    >the engine-block up-side down.with the casting sand debacle still fresh
    >in my mind, I did a close inspection,..and FMFlo, there in the corner of
    >the casting was a clear-coating. I dug it out with a screwdriver and
    >there it was >> SAND ! They had sprayed the internal surfaces of the
    >block with a clear-lacquer to seal the sand in !!.
    >
    >Now I know some folks are accused of BShitting,..and this story is one
    >that fits the criteria. But hey,..I can only report what I saw :-)
    >
    >The dealership didn't want a *bar* of his complaints,..guess he could
    >have hung the tripple webers off a nice wreckers 265,..refitted it with
    >Copper-bronze bearings and touched wood so to speak
    >
    >
    >Jason


    Leyland had a problem with sand in the water jackeyts of their P76 V8.
    It would beeak loose and clog radiators causing overheating.
    They woul flush and flush but the car would be back again in a matter
    of months.




    OzOne of the three twins

    I welcome you to Crackerbox Palace.

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