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Thread: Anyone able to contribute ?

  1. #161
    Ext User(PhilD) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On Sat, 12 Oct 2013 01:04:18 +1100, Noddy <me@wardengineering.com.au>
    wrote:

    >On 12/10/13 12:25 AM, PhilD wrote:
    >
    >> I didn't say it was good just that it's being thought of.

    >
    >God only knows why.
    >
    >> Plenty of people use smart phone Apps and bigger Pads for navigation
    >> and with the phone etc in a car cradle power is taken care of.

    >
    >Not for me. The TomTom does a way better job and is easier to see than
    >my One XL even when it's in it's cradle.
    >

    My phone has a bigger screen than my Garmin.
    >> I have a GPS mapping program running that has all the topo maps for Australia
    >> on it with a couple of different resolutions plus availability to use
    >> Google street mapping and another App that has Australia wide camping
    >> rest stops. The phone is also connected to the car voice controlled
    >> system by Bluetooth and I can answer calls by one button on the
    >> steering wheel and provided I can make it work I can initiate calls by
    >> voice with just the one button push, provided I'm in a reception area
    >> of course.

    >
    >I used to use the bluetooth function of of my TomTom as a hands free
    >phone connect, but it got a bit iffy as the thing got older and doesn't
    >work well with later phones. So I put a bluetooth capable stereo in the
    >ute and that works great.
    >
    >> There's the added problem of which emergency service should respond if
    >> the passengers are unable to speak.

    >
    >Firies probably. If they're unable to talk they're probably going to
    >need help getting out of the wreckage.
    >
    >All this crap they're putting in cars today kinda makes me laugh a bit
    >like mobile phones today. I remember the days when no one had one at all
    >and everyone got by just fine :)
    >

    No, without the technology they died in remote areas :-)

  2. #162
    Ext User(Clocky) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?


    <replytogrouponly@aussie.com> wrote in message
    news:bq8d5914a8et1fkjmjd2lok34uiio9mrq8@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 09 Oct 2013 12:58:31 +1100, Noddy <me@wardengineering.com.au>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>That's the thing isn't it. Regardless of how nice modern vehicles have
    >>become, the amount of confidence they instil in people isn't *quite* the
    >>same. I'd have no qualms about going anywhere in a new car today
    >>provided I was not going anywhere that would be likely to see me perish
    >>if the thing were to suddenly stop.
    >>
    >>If I was heading out into the wilderness the only car I'd take would be
    >>something older and more reliable :)
    >>

    > If going to Melbourne is that bad, why go there?
    >
    > Seriously, I had some thinking about this and I used to be just like
    > that but now quite diminished. I've been known to have a spare
    > distributor to convert back from electronic ignition, extra fuel
    > pump/s, carby overhaul kits, alternator brush kit, spare shocks and
    > coil springs, dual batteries, multiple fuel tanks, belts, hoses, 2
    > spare complete wheels with tyres plus a separate tube, and all with
    > tools to match. There does come a point though where a trailer is then
    > required and a need to reassess priorities.
    >
    > Been venturing in to quite a few Forums etc and I haven't really heard
    > of too many failures in remote areas that have been the result of late
    > model car electronics. It would seem that most bush standings are more
    > likely to be the result of driver issues. Things like overloading and
    > inappropriate speed that result in mechanical failures or stupidity in
    > not understanding the vehicle limitations for certain conditions. Then
    > there's things like not having the necessary basic spares or tools and
    > the knowledge to use them.
    >
    > Sure there's failures of lights etc that really don't cause a
    > stranding, but you can't carry everything, even with an older basic
    > vehicle. If you're likely to be going somewhere where you could perish
    > due to car failure then I don't think that you are anywhere in
    > Australia. Traveling with other vehicles, letting people know exactly
    > where you will be and when, and having appropriate communications plus
    > adequate water and food will get you the help you need. There's no
    > excuse for not having a sat phone as there is a Federal Govt subsidy
    > available that will get you one for up to half price. The application
    > process is so easy. We have one with a pre paid card so no further
    > cost unless it expires or you do need to use and in that case the cost
    > is the least of your troubles.
    >
    > One other common problem for many in remote areas is fuel. Petrol
    > vehicles basically use more so range and availability is a problem.
    > Carrying too much adds to overloading and normal petrol may not be
    > available as OPAL is being forced on to more suppliers. Diesel is an
    > issue due to especially the newer CRD engines and their expensive
    > dislike of contamination with water. Many instances of replacement
    > engines required. If you have a preference for earlier diesels then
    > even they can fail. I had a workmate who had an injector pump failure
    > in a remote area but he actually carried a spare.
    >
    > Had another workmate who drove from Darwin to Adelaide when there was
    > still 900km of dirt on the SA side and was towing a boat. The trailer
    > had a leaf spring failure but there was a wreck nearby with suitable
    > springs so he got out his small Colt oxy acetylene set and made
    > suitable changes.
    >
    > How far do you take it? All cars can have failures somewhere, even
    > much older simpler ones and you can't take every possible spare part
    > and tools. You can only take as much as common sense will allow.
    >
    > As to the possibility of perishing, take away stupidity by being
    > somewhere by yourself, or where you shouldn't be, with no one else
    > knowing where you are and not having water and food to wait for rescue
    > then there's not much worry about it. Not too many remote roads would
    > not see someone else come along fairly often, especially in a week
    > which you should have provisions for anyway. Some of the more renowned
    > remote treks are apparently getting quite crowded during their open
    > season.
    >
    > There are issues I have with my Ford Ranger and its electronics that
    > have had a lot of people end up with flat batteries. There's way too
    > many functions that many would like to see made inactive, or at least
    > under owner control, but finally Ford have seen sense and allowed the
    > "Smart charging system" to be deactivated with a software update. Now
    > you can have a proper charging range of 13.8 to 14.6 instead of
    > something that I've seen as low as 11.9 for hundreds of K's on a long
    > trip. There still seems to be people that it hasn't fixed their
    > problems and there's a number of theories about it. It isn't just Ford
    > who are going this way though.


    Ford are rather slow in going this way, and they are having the same
    problems everyone has already had with these "smart" charging systems. It
    seems everyone I talk to with a Ranger has the same complaint about
    batteries going flat and having to get a jump but that's nothing new.
    For example, when the VE was released in 2006 there was a similar issue with
    flat batteries everywhere, in part caused by a faulty HVAC module and in
    part caused by the smart charging system. They fixed the HVAC module issue
    (and introduced another heh) but the charging system was leaving people
    stranded all over the place in the metro area.

    They solved the problem then in a similar fashion as Ford are having to now
    with the Ranger.


    Putting aside those issues though, I'm
    > quite willing (at this stage of ownership) to struggle through with
    > the comforts provided by the newer technology and its ability to tow
    > the van where it's been so far and where we are likely to take it.
    > Perishing because of car failure just isn't an option worth
    > considering.
    >


    Some stuff isn't necessary like the lights system on the Colorado where a
    single one filament globe does both the park and brake light. It's simple
    enough in operation, but for the average Joe to get their head around it it
    isn't simple and that seems to be something they are forgetting. In that
    regard the Hilux is still low tech and bolting on and wiring in accessories
    isn't an issue.

    Then again, Colorados have never been a good choice, placing the engine ECU
    on top of the engine where heat soak kills it and placing the 4WD module
    under the seat where moisture kills it seems to me particularly bad design
    decisions made by someone who doesn't understand what is expected of these
    kind of vehicles.



  3. #163
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 12/10/13 1:20 AM, PhilD wrote:

    > My phone has a bigger screen than my Garmin.


    Mine's the same, but for some reason the TomTom always seems easier to
    read and use.

    > No, without the technology they died in remote areas :-)


    I think they still do :)



    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

  4. #164
    Ext User(D Walford) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 11/10/2013 11:49 PM, Noddy wrote:
    > On 11/10/13 7:35 PM, D Walford wrote:
    >
    >> WTF is wrong with a good old voltage regulator?

    >
    > They can't stitch you for regular alternator replacements I guess.
    >
    > The bloke across the street has a 100 series diesel Land Cruiser that I
    > Think is an early 00's model and it has ECU controlled alternator
    > output. He's on his third alternator in about as many years, and at 700
    > bucks a pop for an after market one he's a bit over it.


    Could he fit an alternator from an earlier model and by pass the ECU?
    >
    >> Wife's brother bought a new Ford Focus and it has a lot of new fangled
    >> electronics but its less likely to be an issue if it fails on a city
    >> based car.

    >
    > Probably not, but that wouldn't make failures more acceptable for mine.
    >
    > As I've said in another post I'm all in favour of the technology, but
    > when the components are made by the lowest priced bidder it's more than
    > a little concerning. Especially these days with cars having *so* many
    > active control systems that can take a car off the road in a big hurry
    > when they **** up.
    >
    > Like the power steering failures on Corolla's in the US for example.
    >
    >> One thing that it did that I thought was strange was that if you put you
    >> right indicator on then turn off the ignition the RH parkers will stay
    >> on, left indicator on and the LH parkers will stay on and if it was
    >> mentioned in the owners manual he couldn't find it, he had to ring the
    >> dealer and ask why he couldn't turn the parkers off.

    >
    > Bizarre.
    >
    > The fact that cars are getting dumbed down at a steady pace with the
    > addition of more and more "driver aids" is worrying, and in some strange
    > ways.
    >
    > A couple of months ago I read an article about some guy's encounter with
    > the new technology that was kind of amusing, but also quite scary in a
    > way. He was road testing some new car that was loaded up the wah-zoo
    > with all the mod-cons, and one of the things it had was lane guidance
    > control. For those who haven't heard of it, it's a form of steering
    > control whereby the computer senses the car drifting out of it's lane
    > and applies some corrective steering to counter it. It uses the same
    > sensors that are used with adaptive cruise control or collision
    > avoidance systems. It monitors things like indicator application to tell
    > when the driver actually wants to change lanes, and the force applied
    > the the steering wheel to allow for emergency manoeuvres where the
    > indicators are unlikely to be used.
    >
    > However there seems to be a fairy wide null zone, and gets confused
    > pretty easily and at times when you really don't want it to.
    >
    > The guy doing the drive came up on a parked car that was only really
    > visible when the car in front of him moved over to clear it, and when he
    > tried to do the same thing the car grabbed the steering back off him and
    > put him back to where he was which caused an emergency brake brown
    > trouser moment :)
    >
    > Essentially the car had judged his steering input to be less than enough
    > to consider it to be an emergency move, and with no indicator applied it
    > assumed he was drifting out of his lane and took over control of the
    > car. If that wasn't enough to make him (or anyone else) shit themselves,
    > it seemed to get into a conflict with itself where it started to apply
    > the brakes to avoid hitting the parked car (as he was himself) but at
    > the same time wasn't keen to try to steer around it until he reefed on
    > the wheel and let the car know that *this* is the way I want to go you
    > ****en **** of a thing :)
    >
    > Thanks, but as interesting as that all sounds, I like the idea of a
    > steering wheel, three pedals and a gearstick, and what goes on in my
    > head to decide what actually happens :)
    >
    >
    >

    I read a similar story in the newspaper, it happened on a freeway road
    test and the driver went to swerve around around a car that suddenly cut
    into his lane, because he didn't indicate the car wouldn't let him
    swerve so he almost hit the car.
    Seems like a crazy system but it might teach people to indicate:-)

    --
    Daryl

  5. #165
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 12/10/13 1:51 PM, D Walford wrote:

    > Could he fit an alternator from an earlier model and by pass the ECU?


    Don't know, but he's looking into it.

    > I read a similar story in the newspaper, it happened on a freeway road
    > test and the driver went to swerve around around a car that suddenly cut
    > into his lane, because he didn't indicate the car wouldn't let him
    > swerve so he almost hit the car.
    > Seems like a crazy system but it might teach people to indicate:-)


    Surely with all this shit we're getting loaded into cars these days
    we're breeding generations of people who have no ****ing idea how to
    drive at all, and it won't be long before a steering wheel is an
    optional extra.

    That can't be a good thing.



    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

  6. #166
    Ext User(Xeno Lith) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 12/10/13 7:07 PM, Noddy wrote:
    > On 12/10/13 1:51 PM, D Walford wrote:
    >
    >> Could he fit an alternator from an earlier model and by pass the ECU?

    >
    > Don't know, but he's looking into it.
    >
    >> I read a similar story in the newspaper, it happened on a freeway road
    >> test and the driver went to swerve around around a car that suddenly cut
    >> into his lane, because he didn't indicate the car wouldn't let him
    >> swerve so he almost hit the car.
    >> Seems like a crazy system but it might teach people to indicate:-)

    >
    > Surely with all this shit we're getting loaded into cars these days
    > we're breeding generations of people who have no ****ing idea how to
    > drive at all, and it won't be long before a steering wheel is an
    > optional extra.


    That coming from you is an absolute pisser! You can't even drive a basic
    Hyundai Getz down a moderate hill without running out of brakes. It's
    exactly for people like you that all this new technology is being put
    into cars.
    >
    > That can't be a good thing.
    >


    --

    Xeno

  7. #167
    Ext User(D Walford) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 12/10/2013 7:07 PM, Noddy wrote:
    > On 12/10/13 1:51 PM, D Walford wrote:
    >
    >> Could he fit an alternator from an earlier model and by pass the ECU?

    >
    > Don't know, but he's looking into it.
    >
    >> I read a similar story in the newspaper, it happened on a freeway road
    >> test and the driver went to swerve around around a car that suddenly cut
    >> into his lane, because he didn't indicate the car wouldn't let him
    >> swerve so he almost hit the car.
    >> Seems like a crazy system but it might teach people to indicate:-)

    >
    > Surely with all this shit we're getting loaded into cars these days
    > we're breeding generations of people who have no ****ing idea how to
    > drive at all, and it won't be long before a steering wheel is an
    > optional extra.
    >
    > That can't be a good thing.
    >
    >
    >

    It used to be that up market cars were fitted with all the "extras" but
    these days even base models have lots of gear so the marketing
    departments have to look for ways to sell cars which is IMO why we are
    getting cars with all this gadgetry.
    Its ok to look at ways to improve safety but new equipment should at
    least be tested in lots of different scenarios before being fitted to
    production cars, seems they didn't test these lane guidance systems too
    well.

    --
    Daryl

  8. #168
    Ext User(Noddy) Guest

    Re: Anyone able to contribute ?

    On 12/10/13 7:42 PM, D Walford wrote:

    > Its ok to look at ways to improve safety but new equipment should at
    > least be tested in lots of different scenarios before being fitted to
    > production cars, seems they didn't test these lane guidance systems too
    > well.


    That's the problem with things under computer control. It's virtually
    impossible to anticipate every possible scenario and makes allowances
    for it, so the buyers themselves have to become unofficial "beta
    testers" and any unfortunate incidences they may encounter are
    considered lessons learned and the information passed on to the next
    batch of buyers.

    **** that.



    --
    --
    Regards,
    Noddy.

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